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Full text of "Atlantic Christian College Bulletin"

I 



R378.756 ' -' 

At63b 

1916-17 



Febeuaby, 1917. 




No. 2. 



Atlantic Christian College 
BULLETIN 



GENERAL CATALOGUE 

FIFTEENTH SESSION 
1916-17 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

SIXTEENTH SESSION 
1917-18 



A COLLEGE FOR MEN AND WOMEN 



Published quarterly by Atlantic Christian College, Wilson, N. C. 

Entered as Second Class Matter, December 3, 1915, at the Postoffice at 
Wilson, N. C, under the Act of August 24, 1912 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



Vol. II. February, 1917. No. 2. 

Atlantic Christian College 
BULLETIN 



GENERAL CATALOGUE 

FIFTEENTH SESSION 
1916-17 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

SIXTEENTH SESSION 
1917-18 

At6^b 
1916-iy 

A COLLEGE FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

Published quarterly by Atlantic Christian College, Wilson, N. C. 

Entered as Second Class Matter, December 3, 1915, at the Postoffice at 
Wilson, N.C., under the Act_qf August 24 fc 



C. L HARDY LIBRAR 
ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 
WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



CALENDAR 


1917 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


8 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 


5 


M 


T 


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1 


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8 


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13 1 


4 7 


8 


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1f 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


2(1 


21 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 2 


1 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


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23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


22 


2.1 


24 


25 


26 


27 2 


8 21 


22 


2? 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 








29 


30 












29 


30 


31 








28 


29 


30 


31 








FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 










1 


2 


3 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 








1 


2 


3 


4 








1 


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9 


10 


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9 


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10 1 


1 4 


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15 


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17 


13 


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17 


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19 


12 


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14 


15 


16 


171 


8 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


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20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2(1 


21 


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24 


25 


26 


19 


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21 


22 


23 24 2 


S 18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


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24 


25 


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27 


28 








27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 










1 


2 


3 












1 


2 














1 












1 


4 


s 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


3 


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5 


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7 


8 


9 


2 


3 


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5 


6 


7 


1 2 


3 


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5 


6 


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8 


11 


12 


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14 


15 


16 


17 


10 


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16 


9 


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14 1 


5 9 


10 


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14 


15 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


17 


18 


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22 


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16 


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21 2 


2 16 


17 


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25 


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30 


31 


24 


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23 
30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 2 


9 23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


1918 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 


s 


M 


T 


w 


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s 


s 


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F a 


s 


M 


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w 


T 


F 


8 






1 


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4 


5 




1 


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1 


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5 






1 


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7 


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12 1 


! 6 


7 


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14 


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7 20 


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J 27 


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29 


30 


31 






28 


29 


30 










28 


29 


30 


31 






27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 












1 


2 








1 


2 


3 


4 










1 


2 


? 










1 


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i 3 


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12 


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18 


11 


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13 


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16 1 


J 10 


11 


12 


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20 


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22 


23 


19 


20 


21 


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18 


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20 


21 


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23 2' 


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18 


19 


20 


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25 26 


27 


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27 


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30 


31 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 3 


I 24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 










I 1 


2 














1 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 ' 


' 1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


2 


3 


4 


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6 


7 


8 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 1' 


8 


9 


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14 


10 


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12 


13 


1415 


16 


9 


10 


11 


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20 2 


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21 22 


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27 2? 


( 22 


23 


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28 29 


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23 


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29 


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1 




30 











































COLLEGE CALENDAR 
SIXTEENTH SESSION. 1917-1918 



1917. 
September 10 — Monday — Entrance examinations. 
September 11 — Tuesday — Registration of new students and pre- 
sentation of certificates. 
September 12 — Wednesday — Registration of old students. 
September 14 — Friday, 8 P. M. — President's reception. 
October 20 — Saturday — Fall holiday (one day only). 
November 10 — Saturday — First quarter ends. 
November 29 — Thursday — Thanksgiving holiday (one day only). 
December 21 — Friday — Christmas recess begins. 

1918. 
January 2 — Wednesday — Christmas recess ends. 
January 10-12 — Semester examinations. 

January 12 — Saturday — First semester, second quarter ends. 
January 15 — Tuesday — Second semester, third quarter begins. 
March 16 — Saturday — Third quarter ends. 
March 19 — Tuesday — Fourth quarter begins. 
April 6 — Spring holiday. 
May 16-18 — Final examinations. 
May 19-24 — Commencement week. 
Monday is weekly holiday. 



NOTES 

Students who are applicants for entrance to Freshman class on 
examination should report at the college office at 8 o'clock A. M., 
Monday, September 10, for entrance examinations. 

Dining halls will be open to students at noon Monday, September 10. 

All members of faculty should reach Wilson on or not later than 
noon Saturday the 8th for organization work. 

Regular class work will begin at 8 o'clock A. M., Thursday, Sep- 
tember 13. 

Convocation exercises will be held in the chapel at 8 o'clock P. M., 
Tuesday, September 11. 



4808* 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Teems Expiee 1917. 

J. W. Hines Rocky Mount, N. C. 

S. G. Mewboen, Secretary Wilson, N. C. 

W. E. Stubbs Belhaven, N. O. 

C. W. Howaed Kinston, N. C. 

A. J. Moye Farmville, N. C. 

Teems Expiee 1918. 

Geoege Hackney, Chairman Wilson, N. C. 

J. B. Deans Wilson, N. C. 

J. F. Tayloe Kinston, N. C. 

W. O. Manning Williamston, N. C. 

L. J. Chapman Grifton, N. C. 

Teems Expiee 1919. 

J. S. Basnight New Bern, N. C. 

Calvin Woodaed, Treasurer Wilson, N. C. 

Col. S. B. Tayloe Catherine Lake, N. C. 

N. J. Rouse Kinston, N. C. 

J. C. Richardson Garnett, S. C. 

College Physicians : 
Dbs. Dickinson and Williams, of the Wilson Sanatorium. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



President Raymond A. Smith 

General Secretary Charles C. Ware 

Dean of Men W. 0. Lappin 

Dean of Women Anna F. Moobe 

Principal Preparatory School E. L. Bakham 

Secretary of Faculty Frances F. Harper 

Registrar and Librarian Myrtie L. Harper 

Examiner Perry Case 

Field Secretary W. S. Martin 

Secretary to the President, and Bookkeeper. Percy S. Walton 

Matron Women's Dormitory Mrs. Julia Ross 

Matron Men's Dormitory Mrs. H. W. Garner 



Hurrah For Our A. C. C. 

Inscribed to our friend, President Raymond Abner Smith. 
Mrs. W. S. Martin. W. S. Martin. 



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1. Some may boast or their treas-ure of fame, And to gold some may 

2. Here's to all who our stan-dard have borne, And to us ev - er 

3. To ourprex - y a song of good cheer, Loudhuz-zahs to our 



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bow their knee; Bet- ter far than all gold are the treas-ures un-told 
true will be; Here's to all who at- tend, here's to pa -tron and friend, 

fac - ul - ty. — To old Wil-son we sing, and our prais - es shall ring 






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Which we find at our A. C. C. 

Here's suc-cess to our A. C. C. Then hur- rah for our A. C. 



Ev - 'ry>where to our A. C. 



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We will pledge our hearts To be true to our A. C. 



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FACULTY 



Raymond A. Smith, A.M., B.D., 
President and Professor of Education. 

Graduate of Vincennes University (Junior College) 1894; A.B., But- 
ler College, 1900; Graduate Student in Philosophy, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1902-1903; A.M., Butler College, 1904; B.D., Tale 
University, 1905; Graduate Student in Education, West Virginia 
University Summer School, 1914. 

Minister, Kensington Christian Church, Philadelphia, Pa., 1900-1903 ; 
Minister, Hillside Christian Church, Indianapolis, Ind., 1903 and 
1907 ; Minister, Centenary Christian Church, Indianapolis, Ind., 
1909-1913. 

Professor in Atlantic Christian College, 1905-1906 ; Principal and 
Professor of History and Education, Beckley Institute, Beckley, 
West Virginia, 1913-1916; present position, 1916— 



T A^ *"f ^ IS&>- Chas. C. Ware, 

- General Secretary. 



Graduate of College of the Bible, Lexington, Ky., 1907 ; Minister, 
Greenville, N. C, 1910-1911; Greenwood, S. C, 1911-1915; State 
Secretary, South Carolina, 1913-1915 ; State Secretary, North Caro- 
lina, 1915 ; present position, 1915 — 



E. L. Barham, A.M., 



phy** 



Professor of Ancient Languages, and Principal Preparatory 
Department. 

A.B., Burritt College, 1884; A.M., Burritt College, 1886; Superinten- 
dent Public Schools, Hubbard City, Texas, 1890-1895; Principal 
Alamo Latin and yMusic School, Hubbard City, Texas, 1896-1900; 
Principal Academy Texas Christian University, 1900-1901 ; Presi- 
dent Missouri Christian College, 1901-1911 ; Professor of Latin and 
Greek A. C. C, 1911-1915 ; Graduate Student University of Missouri, 
1915-1916 ; present position, 1916— 

Frances F. Harper, A.B., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Graduate of Kinsey Seminary ; Special Student in Mathematics at 
Knoxville Normal and University of Virginia ; A.B., Atlantic Chris- 
tian College, 1917 ; Instructor of Mathematics, A. C. College, 1904- 
1909 ; Professor of Mathematics A. C. College, 1909— 



8 Atlantic Christian College 

W. O. Lappin, A.B., 

Dean of Men, Professor of Social Science. 

Eureka College, A.B., 1911 ; Graduate Student University of Chicago 
in Summer Schools of 1915 and 1916; Assistant in Chemistry and 
Physics, Eureka College ; Minister Christian Churches, Eminence, 
Dana, and Manier, 111. ; Professor of History and Economics A. C. 
College, 1914 ; Professor of Science A. C. C, 1915-1916— 

Perry Case, A.B., B.D., 

Professor Philosophy and Religious Education. 

Indianapolis Business College, 1903 ; College of the Bible, Lexington, 
Ky., 1912 ; A.B., Butler College, 1914 ; B.D., Butler College, 1916. 
City Missionary for Broadway Christian Church, Lexington, Ky., 
1908-1912 ; Minister Columbia Place Christian Church, Indianapolis, 
Ind., 1912-1915; Rural Work, Wayne County, Ind., 1915-1916; 
present position, 1916 — 

W. S. Martin, A.M., B.D., 

Professor of English Bible, Homiletics and Pastoral Theology. 

A.B., Dummer College, 1882; A.M., Dummer College, 1885; Special 
Student Harvard University, 1887 ; B.D., Andover Divinity School, 
1890; Mus. B., Boston College of Music, 1893; Honorary Degree 
Mus. D., Bowdion and Dummer College; Teacher of Bible and 
Music in the Boston Lay College, 1895-1897; Pastor of Churches 
in Vermont, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Canada, Illinois ; 
Professor of English Bible, Nyack (on Hudson), N. Y., 1915-1916; 
Professor of English Bible, Atlantic Christian College, 1916 — 



.*TG>Jtfc*s<MN, A.B., ^\. \ } \ 

Professor of English. 



Union College, 1915, with Special Honors in English and Latin; 
Special Student in English and Divinity, New York, 1915-1916; 
Pastor or Assistant Pastor in Churches in Brooklyn, Burnt Hills, 
and Half Moon, N. Y. ; Professor of English, Atlantic Christian 
College, 1916- ^, ^ , 

J e itm ito -fe EK ȣUjpER, A.B., I v . ifL^uihiAJ^ 

Professor of Modern Languages, v^*^ 

A.B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 ; Professor of Language, Lees 
Collegiate Institute, Jackson, Ky., 1913-1915; Professor Language, 
Marvin College, 1915-1916; Graduate Student, Summer 1915, Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati; present position 1916 — 



Faculty 9 

Clarence F. Whitney, A.B., 

Professor of Science. 

A.B., Hiram College, 1915 ; Professor of Science Beckley Institute, 
1915-1916; Professor of Science Atlantic Christian College, 1917— 

Ivy May Smith, B. Mtjs., 

Director School of Music. 

Graduate Pupil of Oliver Willard Pierce, Metropolitan School of 
Music ; Post-Graduate in Normal Training, Co-Operative School of 
Music, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Pupil of Rudolf Ganz, Syracuse, N. Y. ; 
Dean of Music, Girl's Seminary, Ky., 1903-1904; Indianapolis Col- 
lege of Music, 1904-1905; Conservatory of Music, 1905-1906; Co- 
Operative School of Music, 1906-1908 ; Dean of Music, Indiana Cen- 
tral University. 1908-1915 ; ffr/bsent position, 1916 — 




Piano, Counterpoint, Music Form and Analysis. 

Goldbeck College of Music, 1894; Special Work with Charles W. 
Landon, 1897; Hanchett, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1900; Sherwood, Lake 
Chautauqua, N. Y., 1902, 1905, 1909; Teacher of Piano and Voice, 
Hubbard City, Tex., 1890-1900 ; Director of Music, Texas Christian 
University, 1900-1907; Director of Music, Missouri Christian Col- 
lege, 1907-1911; present position, 1911 — 

Mrs. W. O. Lappin, 

Piano, Harmony, History of Music. 

Graduate Teacher's Department Illinois Wesleyan College of Music, 
1898, under O. R. Skinner; Harmony with Mrs. Jno. R. Gray Col- 
lege of Music. 

Anna Florence Moore, 

Dean of Women and Director of School of Expression. 

M. L. Gaylord Hall, Platte, Mo. ; School of Expression, Chautauqua, 
N. Y. ; Special Student, Toronto, Canada ; School of Physical Edu- 
cation, Chautauqua, N. Y. ; Director Dramatic Art and Physical 
Education, Carleton-Carr College, Sherman, Tex., two years ; 
Madison Institute, Richmond, Ky., three years ; City Schools, Yoa- 
kum, Texas, one year ; Studio, Palmyra, Mo., two years ; present 
position, 1916 — 



10 Ail 




Director School of Art. 

Graduate of Classes "A" and "B" of the Massachusetts Normal Art 
School ; three years experience as Art Instructor under Dr. Walker, 
Olathe, Kansas ; China Painting under Miss Dahlrymple, Boston, 
and Advanced Work at Garden Studios, Boston ; present position, 
1917— 

Pauline Helen Griffin, 

Instructor in Voice. 

Student in Meredith College ; Cotoqui, Rome, 1913 ; Teacher in Mars 
Hill College, 1913-1915 ; present position, 1916— 

Myrtie L. Harper, 
Librarian. 

Nellie Mae Krise, 

Instructor in History. 

Graduate Beckley Institute, 1913 ; Graduate of Beckley Institute 
Normal School, 1915; Teacher Mabscott, W. Va. Public Schools, 
1915-1916. 

Carrie Lee Krise, 

Instructor in Science. 

Graduate Beckley Institute, 1913 ; Graduate Beckley Institute Nor- 
mal School, 1915; Assistant Principal Public Schools, Mabscott, 
W. Va., 1915-1916. 

Lida Pearl Clay, 

Instructor in English. 

Graduate of Beckley Institute, 1915; Graduate of Beckley Institute 
Normal School, 1916; Instructor in English and Domestic Art, 
Beckley Institute, 1915-1916. 

Lura Neuby Clay, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Graduate of Beckley Institute, 1915 ; Graduate of Beckley Institute 
Normal School, 1916; Supply Grade Teacher Beckley Institute, 
1915-1916. 



Faculty 11 

Sheridan Lee Sadleb, 

Instructor in English. 

Student Virginia Christian College, Atlantic Christian College; Prin- 
cipal Summer Schools — Arapahoe for five summers; Principal 
State High School, Richlands, N. C, 1915-1916; present position, 
1917— 

Bonita Wolff, 

Instructor in Latin. 

(Senior Student, Atlantic Christian College.) 



12 Atlantic Christian College 



NEEDS OF THE COLLEGE 



Atlantic Christian College has a large place to fill in the educational 
life of the Carolinas. If the College is to fill that place adequately, 
there is imperative need of an endowment. Herein lies a clear 
opportunity for the giving of money that will do great good, not only 
to the present generation of young people, but to the generations 
that are to come. The College also needs a Science Building, and a 
central heating plant, as well as a farm accessible to the College. 
In view of these needs, any bona fide gift in personal property, or 
real estate, is acceptable to the Institution. We insert here a form 
of bequest, which may be used as a paragraph in any will. Address 
the President, or Registrar, for any additional information required. 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



North Carolina, County. 

I, , 

of the county and State aforesaid, being of sound mind, do make and 
declare this my last will and testament : 

Item first 

Item second 

Item- third. I give, devise and bequeath unto the Atlantic Chris- 
tian College (Inc.), of Wilson, North Carolina (here describe what- 
ever is given to said College) 



in fee, absolutely and forever. 



Atlantic Christian College 



General Information 



^JD* ILSOJST, the seat of Atlantic Christian College, is 
4Htl ideally located for a college town. The main lines 
of two railway systems pass through it. The At- 
lantic Coast Line, running north and south, makes splendid 
connection with all the branches of that system. The Norfolk 
Southern, running east and west, makes easy access possible 
from these directions. With about twenty passenger trains 
passing through it each day and every train stopping, you 
are never far from home when at Atlantic Christian College. 
The environments of Wilson are equally as advantageous 
as its accessibility. Wilson is a beautiful city, with good 
walks, electric lights, filtered water, successful sewerage 
system, and good health record. In the center of a prosperous 
farming section, it is a great cotton market, the largest ex- 
clusive loose leaf bright tobacco market in the world. Its 
citizens are hospitable, courteous and cordial. Its churches, 
representing the leading denominations, have handsome edi- 
fices of worship and are in a flourishing condition. 

In a thriving town of about twelve thousand population, 
having most of the advantages of a larger city, you are not 
lost and unknown in the multitude. We are able to keep 
track of our students. They are known to the people of the 
town, and it is not long before those of real worth are recog- 
nized. In such a center of religious, political and business 
influence our students come in contact with some of the 
greatest preachers, doctors, lawyers and business men of the 
State, and such opportunities are not to be undervalued. 

Historical Sketch 

The fifty-seventh North Carolina Christian Missionary 
Convention met at Kinston, 1ST. C, October 30 to November 
2, 1901. The Committee on Education, consisting of D. W. 



14 Atlantic Christian College 

Davis, B. H. Melton, W. J. Grumpier, E. A. Moye, and Dr. 
H. D. Harper, made a favorable report for the purchase 
of Kinsey Seminary, in Wilson, N". C, from the Wilson Edu- 
cational Association. According to the report of this com- 
mittee, which was duly adopted, the Board of Managers of 
the 1ST. C. C. M. C. were to act as agents of the Convention 
in acquiring this college property, and were to appoint four 
trustees to have immediate supervision of college. The insti- 
tution was named Atlantic Christian College and incorporated 
May 1, 1902. Mr. George Hackney, of Wilson, 1ST. C, was 
made Treasurer of the college, and about $4,000 was con- 
tributed the first year. The building was taxed to its utmost 
capacity with students at the college opening in September, 
1902. The college property was bonded for the original 
indebtedness of about $11,000 in 1902, which was fully paid 
in 1911. The payment of this debt made accessible the 
"W. 1ST. and Orpah Hackney Memorial Fund," which was 
bequeathed "for the education of worthy young men and 
women," and which consisted of real estate in Wilson to the 
value of about $3,000. In 1911 there was built a modern 
brick dormitory for men, on the campus, at an expense of 
about $15,000. In 1914 there was acquired a 672-acre farm 
in Onslow County, two miles south of Jacksonville, N". C. 

The following have presided over the institution: J. C. 
Coggins, 1902-1904; J. J. Harper, 1904-1907; J. C. Cald- 
well, 1907-1916; E. A. Smith, 1916—. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The college is located in a quiet section in the northern 
part of Wilson. The campus occupies a large city block of 
about six acres. The two main buildings are substantial brick 
structures. They are thoroughly modern in every respect, 
heated throughout by steam, lighted by electricity. Modern 
plumbing and adequate bath facilities contribute to health and 
comfort. The furnishings will compare favorably with the 
best of similar institutions. 



General Information 15 

CO-EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

The institution is co-educational. The supervision is so 
close and vital, however, that we feel all objectionable features 
have been practically eliminated. 

In the dormitory for young women the lady teachers reside 
on the same floor with the young ladies. The oversight and 
care is substantially as exclusive as in institutions for women 
only. 

The young men have their own exclusive dormitory and 
society hall. A small athletic field with tennis and basket- 
ball courts furnishes adequate opportunity for recreation and 
sport in the open air, which in this climate is possible almost 
every day in the year. Several men of the faculty, with their 
wives, reside in the boys' dormitory. Thus we endeavor to 
secure such results by close supervision and care as will beget 
the best in study and in character training. 

RELIGIOUS CULTURE 

Frequently young people going from home to college ad- 
vance mentally, but retrograde morally. We endeavor to make 
this impossible at Atlantic Christian College. We care for 
character as well as intellect. We keep our students in a 
good moral atmosphere, throwing about them proper restraints 
and safeguards, and giving them counsel. 

Every morning the students and professors assemble in the 
college auditorium for chapel exercises. The services are con- 
ducted by members of the faculty and visiting ministers of 
the Gospel. Brief addresses and lectures are given on religion, 
morals, good manners, temperance, the choosing of profes- 
sions and vocations in life, etc. Visitors are always welcome. 

Students are expected to attend religious services at some 
church each Lord's Day. 

The young men and young women maintain their own 
special prayer meetings in each of the buildings. These 
meetings do much to develop the devotional spirit and the 
power to publicly express their devotions. 



16 Atlantic Christian College 

The Young Woman's Christian Association is a constantly 
increasing source of strength and inspiration to the young 
women who want to make the most of their college life. At 
the regular meetings there is profitable discussion of devo- 
tional topics. Moreover the members of this organization 
may enjoy the privileges of the widely known Students' Con- 
ference at Blue Ridge, N. C, each June. 

MISSION STUDY BOOK CLUB 

This organization of young women, as its name purports, 
is devoted to the study of missions — the people that sit in 
darkness, the literature, the work and the workers. The best 
books on the subject are read and discussed. Becoming thus 
familiar with this greatest field of human endeavor, its mem- 
bers are enabled enthusiastically and intelligently to give aid 
in the department of church missionary service. 

MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 

Under the leadership for the past year of Dr. W. S. Martin, 
this organization has been of great service to its members. 
The weekly sessions are given to the study of such problems 
as practically concern the young minister in his work. Some- 
times the hour becomes an old fashioned experience meeting, 
where faith flows and grows from heart to heart and joy 
abounds. From such seasons each goes to his labor with 
deeper purpose and clearer vision. It includes all ministerial 
members of the college, and such others as may elect to share 
in its work. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 

There are two Societies and a Debating Club for literary 
and general culture. These Societies are among the most 
beneficial and enjoyable features of the student life at the 
college. 

The Alethian and Hesperian Societies are composed of 
young women and young men. These Societies meet on alter- 
nate Monday evenings and their exercises consist of instru- 



General Information 17 

mental and vocal music, readings, essays, discussions and 
debates. 

The Adelphian Debating Club is exclusively for the young 
men, meeting each Friday evening. This supplies oppor- 
tunity for practical forensic training, a valuable cultivation 
for public addresses. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

On the college grounds are courts for tennis and basket- 
ball, affording opportunity for out-of-door exercise. 

Regular classes in physical culture are conducted by the 
physical director for young women. Few young women who 
enter college manifest ease and grace of movement combined 
with proper muscular and nervous control. Many have some 
real physical deformity, such as spinal curvature or round 
shoulders. 

Our courses in physical culture are required of all young 
women. The aim is both educative and recreative. Begin- 
ning with calisthenics and light gymnastics, pupils are ad- 
vanced as rapidly as possible into aesthetic movements, which 
give poise of body and grace so essential to womanhood. 

ATHLETICS 

College sports, such as tennis, basket-ball and baseball are 
encouraged. Good tennis and basket-ball courts are main- 
tained on the campus for both women and men. Within two 
blocks of the college is an excellent baseball park which, 
through the generosity of our brother R. H. Rountree, of New 
York, we have been allowed to use for a number of years. 
This is one of the best ball parks in the State. 

While athletics is generally cultivated by the student body 
and encouraged by the faculty, it has not become the chief 
factor of our student life. Those who make the ball teams 
are required to be bona fide students. We do not desire a man 
who comes pre-eminently for athletics. Students who play 
match games with other colleges must have a class standing 
2 



18 Atlantic Christian College 

of passing grade at the time of the contest. Not more than 
five days absence during any semester is permitted any stu- 
dent for the purpose of sport. 

The matriculation fee for the coming year will include the 
fee for athletics, and will entitle all students to the privilege 
of playing on the grounds and to free admission to games 
played on our fields. 

THE RADIANT 

But few publications of the kind excel the Radiant, issued 
quarterly by the students of the college. Through its col- 
umns opportunity is offered for genuine literary culture — 
thought takes symmetrical form and fittest mold. It is also 
a powerful means for the gendering and expression of a 
healthy and clean college spirit. No blackmail is tolerated; 
toadyism is despised. Through it every student who has 
something to say and can worthily say it, finds avenue for 
his contention or sentiment. 

The staff is elected from the student body and alumni under 
the general direction of the Committee on Publications. 

THE PINE KNOT 

On the center tables of our friends and students, "a thing 
of beauty," whose well-thumbed pages show it "is a joy for- 
ever," lies the Pine Knot., the College Annual. 

It represents our best manhood and womanhood — the spirit 
that takes and gives, that dares and does, and falters not. It 
represents also the business energy and civic pride and hearty 
liberality that has placed Wilson among the best towns and 
cities of our Southland. Without the generous support of 
the business men of Wilson this splendid publication could 
not be made. Without the hearty co-operation of our students 
and friends it could not exist. 

With becoming pride, therefore, we present it as the pledge 
of our common interest. 



General Information 19 

THE BULLETIN 

Through this publication the college makes announcements 
promptly, and prints news of general interest for its numer- 
ous friends, thus bringing the institution per se into close 
touch with its constituency. It is issued each November, 
February, May and July. 

LIBRARY 

A good working library has become an indispensable part 
of the equipment. We have installed a library of about two 
thousand volumes of well selected books, which have been 
carefully catalogued and indexed. In connection with the 
library is a reading room supplied with the leading maga- 
zines and serials, which students can use when they have 
spare moments. This room will provide a quiet place for 
local pupils to study during all vacant periods. The librarian 
will be in constant attendance during open hours. 

LABORATORY 

The laboratory for preparatory physics and general chem- 
istry is thoroughly equipped to meet the most exacting re- 
quirements. We are equipped for general biological work. 

r 
RESERVATION OF ROOMS 

The rooms previously occupied are reserved for former 
students until August the 1st. A deposit of five dollars is 
required for the reservation of the room after that date. This 
will be credited on first quarter's expenses, or, if notice is 
given in writing three weeks before the opening of school that 
the student cannot attend, the money will be refunded. Be- 
ginning August the 15th, room assignments will be made to 
new students in the order in which their applications have 
been received. No room can be claimed unless the deposit 
has been made. 



20 Atlantic Christian College 

WHAT BOARDING PUPILS AND TEACHERS ARE REQUIRED 
TO FURNISH 

One pair blankets or comforts, one quilt, three sheets, two 
white bed-spreads, one pillow, two pillow-cases, towels and 
table napkins, soap, laundry bags, comb and brush, and pair 
of overshoes. Each young lady is required to have in addition 
both a raincoat and an umbrella. All articles, including 
trunks and valises, should be marked distinctly with the 
owner's name. Each student should bring knife, fork and 
spoon, as table cutlery cannot be sent to rooms. 

We advise those who desire to make their rooms cozy and 
attractive to bring rugs, sofa pillows and pictures. 

DISCIPLINARY POLICY 

It is the aim of the institution to have all members of the 
faculty reside in the buildings with the students. This 
affords the best possible opportunity for that personal contact 
and care for which the institution stands. The splendid op- 
portunities now offered by our graded schools are preparing 
pupils for college at too immature an age for them to be out 
from under all restraining influence. Below is attached a 
list of regulations which all teachers, patrons and students 
are requested to note. 

REGULATIONS 

Matriculation 

All students when arriving at the college should report 
at once at the college office and matriculate, and be assigned 
to specific rooms and classes. Failure to do so will cause 
needless loss of time and expense. 

Matriculation obligates all pupils to conduct themselves 
with propriety on all occasions, and to conform to all rules 
that may be made for their government. 

A fee of ten ($10) dollars is charged all students for 
matriculation, and is due and payable in full at the time the 
student is assigned to room in the dormitory and to classes. 



General Information 21 

This fee may be increased to $15 if matriculation is deferred 
beyond the time set apart especially for this work by the 
college. 

Dormitories 

Students are required to keep their own rooms in order, 
and are held responsible for any damage to furniture or 
building. 

Meals will be sent to the rooms in case of sickness only, 
and then by order of the matron of the dormitory. 

Ten o'clock P. M. is bed time in both dormitories. Lights 
will not be permitted after 10 :20 P. M. 

Students residing in the dormitories will not leave the 
campus at any time without the knowledge and consent of the 
dean of men or the dean of women. 

Chapel and Sunday Services 

All students will be required to attend chapel exercises 
daily, and Sunday School and public worship once on Sun- 
day. Pupils are permitted, however, to attend the church of 
their choice, or with which they or their parents are affiliated. 

Communications 

All communications concerning the men must be made to 
the dean of men, and concerning the women to the dean of 
women, and not sent through the students. This arrange- 
ment avoids many unpleasant misunderstandings. 

Parents and guardians should mail direct to the President 
of the College all drafts, checks and money orders, and not 
send through the student. 

Parents will furnish lists of correspondents with whom 
they wish their daughters to correspond. Experience has 
shown this to be wise. 

Parents will receive timely notice in case of serious illness. 
Please inquire of the dean of men or women before taking 
action in case of sickness. 



22 Atlantic Christian College 

Visitors 

Visitors are always welcome at the college. Rooms are 
equipped in each dormitory for their entertainment. A 
nominal charge of 35 cents per meal is made to cover cost of 
material and service. Students and teachers will obtain from 
the matron of respective dormitories, meal tickets for their 
guests, and same will be charged to their accounts. Students 
may have guests only with the consent of their parents or 
guardians. 

All visitors, while our guests, are under the same regula- 
tions as students. 

Permissions 

Needful permissions will be granted to the young men by 
the dean of men, to the young women by the dean of women. 
Permissions will not be granted at any time that conflict with 
the pupil's best interest, the general regulations of the col- 
lege or the specific request of the parents. 

Parents coming to Wilson, and desiring to see their sons 
or daughters, will please call at the college. 

Students are not permitted to go down town in response to 
telephone requests. 

SELF HELP 

Opportunity is offered a number of students to earn their 
board. The work does not take time from recitation, and 
interferes very little with study hours. Thirty hours per 
week in sweeping, washing dishes, waiting on table or firing 
furnaces is exchanged for board. Preference is given to those 
who could not otherwise obtain an education. 

BENEFITS 

Those preparing to be missionaries, ministerial students, 
and also children of recognized ministers in active service 
are charged only one-half the literary tuition. If ministerial 
or missionary students change their life plan they are ex- 
pected to pay the college the balance on tuition. 



General Information 23 

ORPAH HACKNEY FUND 

By a bequest of Mrs. Orpah Hackney, we are enabled to 
make concessions in room rent to a limited number of students 
preparing for the ministry. 



24 Atlantic Christian College 



The College 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS 

The general aim of the college is to furnish instruction of 
standard grade to those desiring a liberal education. Only- 
such courses are offered as our equipment will justify. The 
institution does not pride itself on the number of its graduates. 
It does insist, however, that those to whom we give degrees 
shall merit them on the standard of any college in the United 
States. 

Students are admitted to the Freshman class either by 
certificate or examination. 

Students desiring to be admitted on certificate should send 
to the college for blank certificate to be filled out and signed 
by the principal of the school they are attending. Those 
bearing the prescribed certificate of an accredited secondary 
school will be admitted to the classes of the college without 
examination. Students desiring to enter Freshman class 
without certificate, will present themselves for examination 
at the college at 8 A. M. Monday, September 10, 19 IT. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

For admission to regular Freshman standing in the college 
the applicant must have credit for fifteen units, obtained by 
examination or on certificate from a duly accredited second- 
ary school. Of the fifteen units required for admission to 
the curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, ten 
are definitely prescribed as follows: 



The College 25 

Units. 
English 3 

Latin 2 

History 1 

Mathematics \ -m° ^ _, 

| Plane Geometry 1 3 

Physics (any one) 
Chemistry 
Science \ Physiology and Sanitation 1 

Biology 
General Science 

Total prescribed 10 

The remaining five units may be chosen from the follow- 
ing : Units. 

English 1 

Latin 1 to 2 

Greek 2 to 3 

German 2 to 3 

French 2 to 3 

Spanish 2 to 3 

History and Civics y 2 to 2 

Agriculture 1 

Physiography 1 

Solid Geometry y 2 

Plane Trigonometry y 2 

Any Science 

(Above mentioned additional 
to one required) 1 

Vocational Studies 1 

Drawing _^ 1 

A single unit of language will not be accepted unless fur- 
ther work in that language is taken in the college. 

A unit is a course of five periods weekly of forty-five minute 
recitations through a school year of thptyisixrweel^r . jnriArtv 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 
48084 m LM N0,~-i CAROLINA 



26 Atlantic Christian College 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

To be classified as a Freshman in the college, a student 
must have credit for at least thirteen units of entrance require- 
ments. To be classified as a regular Freshman he must have 
fulfilled all entrance requirements. To be classified as a 
Sophomore, he must have credit for twenty-five hours of 
college work ; as Junior, fifty-eight hours ; as a Senior, ninety- 
two hours. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Students bringing proper certificates from other colleges of 
good standing will be given advanced credit for such work 
without examination, on the approval of the professor in 
whose department the advanced credit is sought, but at least 
one year's residence at the college will be required of every 
candidate for a baccalaureate degree. ]STo advanced standing 
is given for work done in a secondary school. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Those desiring special courses are admitted without regular 
examination to classes for which they are prepared, according 
to the rules of the Association of Colleges and Preparatory 
Schools of the Southern States. 

DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 

For full description of these requirements, see description 
of courses of study under the Model High School Curriculum, 
and compare with entrance requirements listed above. 

CERTIFICATES, DIPLOMAS, AND DEGREES 

Any student who has maintained a good moral character 
during his course of study, and passed satisfactory examina- 
tion in his work, and paid his bills, is entitled to graduate 
from the school in which he has finished the prescribed work. 
Appropriate diplomas will be conferred at the commencement 
exercises of the college. 



The College 27 

]STo diploma will be granted to any student who has not 
completed the college entrance requirements for Southern 
Colleges. Those, however, who expect to graduate in special 
departments, may pursue their preparatory work in connec- 
tion with their special work. 

English diplomas are given to those who complete the 
courses in the schools of Art, Music, and Expression. 

Only one baccalaureate degree is conferred by the college — 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

AMOUNT OF WORK REQUIRED 

The "semester hour" is the standard for computing the 
amount of work required in the curricula leading to this 
degree. The "hour" represents the amount of work done in 
one semester (eighteen weeks) in one recitation hour with two 
preparation hours a week. ~No student is permitted to register 
for less than fourteen hours or more than seventeen hours of 
work in any one semester, except by special consent of faculty 
on advice of student's class officer. 

A baccalaureate degree in the college is conferred upon any 
student who satisfies all entrance requirements and secures 
credit for one hundred twenty-eight semester hours selected 
in accordance with the following provisions : 

GROUPS OF STUDIES 

The subjects of study are arranged in three groups : 

1. Language: English, Latin, Greek, German, French, 
Expression. 

2. Philosophy: Philosophy, Education, History, Eco- 
nomics, Sociology, Anthropology, Biblical Literature. 

3. Science: Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Botany, 
Zoology, Geology, Biology, Agriculture. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Major Subjects: At the beginning of the Sophomore year 
the student must select "his major study from one of the above 
groups. The work required in the major is thirty hours in 



28 Atlantic Christian College 

one subject, or twenty hours in one subject and ten hours in 
another related subject. 

The head of the department to which the major subject 
belongs becomes the student's class officer. (See duties of 
class officer elsewhere in catalog.) When the student has 
selected his major subject, he will not be permitted to change 
to another major without the consent of the committee on 
classification and grades. 

Minor Subjects: Thirty hours in each of the two remain- 
ing (minor) groups is required. Less than six hours in any 
one subject will not be counted as part of the thirty hours 
required. 

The following work will be required of all Freshmen: 
Mathematics, three hours; Science, three hours; History, 
three hours; Foreign Language, three hours; English, three 
hours; Elective, one hour. 

Required English: Six hours of Rhetoric and Composi- 
tion and six hours of English Literature are required of all 
candidates for degrees. 

Required Bible: Six hours of Biblical Literature will be 
required of all candidates for the A.B. Degree. This course 
may be taken in such year in the student's college work as 
he may elect. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

A. Languages: — 1. Ancient Language: If the student 
offers four units of Latin and Greek for entrance, ten hours 
of ancient language are required ; if, however, he offers less 
than four units for entrance this requirement will be pro- 
portionately increased. The time may be divided between 
Latin and Greek at the option of the student, provided that 
not less than ten hours in a language be elected. 

2. Modern Language: Ten hours in one modern language 
is required. 



The College 29 

B. Philosophy : — Twelve hours; two out of the three fol- 
lowing subjects or groups of subjects are required : History, 
six hours; Economics and Sociology, six hours; Philosophy 
and Education, six hours. 

C. Science: — Sixteen hours; two out of the following sub- 
jects are required: Mathematics, eight hours; Physics or 
Chemistry, eight hours; Botany or Zoology, eight hours; 
Geology or Agriculture, eight hours. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The remaining work necessary to make up the total of one 
hundred and twenty-eight hours required of candidates for 
the Bachelor's Degree may be selected from any of the courses 
offered in the College. Work in the department of Biblical 
Literature may be included in the list of elective credits 
offered by students in the college. Credit will also be given 
for six hours in History of Music and Theory, and six hours 
in Expression towards the Bachelor's degree. 

THE CLASS OFFICER 

The duties of the class officer are as follows : 

1. To assign the student to proper courses, and see that 
prescribed work is taken in order. 

2. To supervise the selection of elective courses by the 
student. 

3. To keep a record of the work done by the student and to 
recommend him for his degree or diploma when the work is 
completed. 

4. The student will look to his class officer for advice and 
guidance in all matters pertaining to his work. Withdrawal 
from classes, changing from one class to another, etc., will 
always require the class officer's consent. 



30 Atlantic Christian College 

Description of Courses of Instruction 

Note. — Courses in brackets not offered in 1917-1918 



English Language and Literature 

PROFESSOR MARTIN. 

A — 1 and 2. Rhetoric and Composition. 

The aim of this course is to train the student to give 
clear, correct, and forceful expression to his own 
thoughts. The work consists in study of rhetorical prin- 
ciples and practice in composition. In 1916-1 7, English 
Composition in Theory and Practice, by Canby and 
others, Wooley's Handbook of Composition, and Scrib- 
ner's Magazine were used as text-books. 

Required of Freshmen in all courses. Three hours 
weekly throughout the year. Tu., Th. and S., 2 :30. 

B — 1 and 2. History of English Literature. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with 
the broad outline of the history of English Literature, 
to introduce him to some of its masterpieces, and to 
afford him a basis for more advanced study. In 19 17- 
1918 Brooke's English Literature will be used as text- 
book. In the first semester Chaucer's Prologue will be 
read with care, and other selections from the Canter- 
bury Tales, a number of metrical romances and ballads, 
selections from Malony's Morte d' Arthur, and Book I 
of Spenser's Faerie Queen in a more cursory manner. 
In the second semester Hamlet, Othello, or King Lear 
will be studied, and others of Shakespeare's plays, selec- 
tions from the prose of the age of Anne, from the poetry 
of the period of Romanticism, and from prose of the 
Victorian age will be read more rapidly. 

In 1916-17 the scope of this course was restricted, 



Description of Courses of Instruction 31 

since in that year it was designed as an introduction to 
Course E. 

Required of Sophomores in all courses. Three hours 
weekly throughout the year. W., F. and S., 11 :30. 

[C— 1 and 2. The Drama. 

The purpose of this and of Course D is to trace the 
history of the evolution of the drama, and to study rep- 
resentative works of the masters of dramatic art. 

In the first semester of 1916-1 7 the development of 
the Greek drama from the original ballad dance to the 
perfected tragedy was outlined in lectures, and a num- 
ber of the masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and 
Euripides were analyzed. The class read in English 
translations several of the plays of each of those trage- 
dians. Following the Greek drama, the Roman drama 
was briefly studied for the sake of its influence on the 
Elizabethan drama; then the closing weeks of the 
semester were devoted to the study of Medieval drama. 

The opening weeks of the second semester were occu- 
pied with a study of the development of the drama in 
the hands of Shakespeare's predecessors. The greater 
part of the second semester was devoted to the study 
of Shakespeare's personality, philosophy, and art. The 
technique of Elizabethan drama was briefly discussed, 
and compared with that of the Greek drama. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Three hours weekly 
throughout the year. 

[D— 1 and 2. 

The work of this course will be a continuation of that 
of Course C. One or the other of the following groups 
will be selected: 

(a) The plays of Shakespeare. Attention will be paid 
to Shakespeare's language, grammar, and style, his versi- 
fication, the chronological order of his plays, the history 
of the text, his sources, Shakespeare the man, his rela- 
tion to his age, and the history of his reputation. 



32 Atlantic Christian College 

(b) Shakespeare's contemporaries, the decline of the 
Jacobean and Caroline drama and its extinction; the 
drama in France; the Restoration drama in England; 
the drama of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

Elective for Seniors who have completed Course C. 
Three hours weekly throughout the year.] 

E — 1 and 2. English Poetry Since Dryden. 

In the first semester the growth of formalism in 
English verse will be traced, the vogue of Pope will be 
noted, the influences contributing to the Romantic Revolt 
will be considered, and, in the latter part of the semester 
the work of the poets of the transition and of the 
Northern school will be studied with some care. In the 
second semester the poets of the Romantic Movement 
will be studied, with especial attention paid to Words- 
worth and Shelley. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Three hours 
weekly throughout the year. Tu., Th. and S., 9. 

[F — 1 and 2. Victorian and Later Poetry. 

The first semester and half of the second will be de- 
voted to the Victorian poets, Browning and Tennyson, 
receiving the more attention; the rest of the year will 
be given over to the study of contemporary movements 
in poetry. 

Elective for Seniors who have completed Course E. 
Three hours weekly throughout the year.] 

G — 1 and 2. Nineteenth Century Literature. 

The subject matter of this course will vary from year 
to year. Two of the following groups will ordinarily be 
selected : 

(a) The Victorian Novel: The readings will consist 
of novels dealing with different phases of nineteenth 
century life. 



Description of Courses of Instruction 33 

(b) Victorian Prose, with especial study of Carlyle, 
Newman, Buskin, Arnold, and Pater. 

(c) American literature of the middle nineteenth 
century. 

(d) The modern short story. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors who are taking either 
Course D or Course E. Two hours weekly throughout 
the year. W. and F., 9. 

H — 1 and 2. Argumentation and Debate. 

The work consists in the study of theory of argumen- 
tation and practice in the analysis of subjects, prepara- 
tion of briefs, and formal delivery of the finished ora- 
tion, subject to individual criticism and general discus- 
sion. Parliamentary law will be studied and practice 
will be afforded in the conduct of meetings. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Two hours weekly 
throughout the year. Tu. and Th., 11 :30. 



34 Atlantic Christian College 

Ancient Languages 

PROFESSOR BARHAM. 



LATIN 



A — 1. Livy, Books I and XXI. Composition. Illustrated 
Lectures. 
Three hours first semester. 

2. Horace, Odes, Epodes and Carmen Saeculare. 
Composition. Illustrated lectures. 

Three hours second semester. Tu., Th. and S., 8. 

B — 1. Horace, Satires and Epistles. Roman Private Life. 
Illustrated studies. 
Three hours first semester. 

2. Cicero, De Senectute; Tacitus, Germania. Par- 
allel readings and illustrated studies. 

Three hours second semester. Tu., Th. and S., 9. 

[C — 1. Plautns, Captivi and Trinummus; Terrence, Phan- 
mio. 
Three hours first semester. 

2. Selected poems from Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, 
Ovid. 

Three hours second semester.] 

[D — 1. Lucretius, De Rerum Xatura. 
Three hours first semester. 
2. Juvenal, Satires; Seneca, Tragedies. 
Three hours second semester. 

For Courses D 1 and 2, a course of general reading 
from Smith's Latin Selections may be substituted.] 

E — Latin Literature. 

A brief survey, using MakaiPs Latin Literature as a 
base. Designed to supplement Course C-l, but may be 
used with Courses A-l or B-l. 

One hour weekly — one semester. W., 8. 



Description of Courses of Instruction 35 

[F — Latin Prose Composition. 

Designed to accompany Courses A-l and 2, or B-l 
and 2. 

One hour through the year.] 

G — Roman Private Life. 

Abbott's Society and Politics of Ancient Rome used 
as a base. Designed to complete Course B-l, but open to 
students not studying the Latin Language. 

One hour one semester. F., 8. 

GREEK 

A— 1. Homer's Iliad, Books I, II, III. 

Studies and illustrated lectures on Homeric times 
and life. 

Three hours first semester. Tu., Th. and S., 11 :30. 

2. Plato's Apology and Crito. 
Illustrated studies and parallel readings. 

Three hours second semester. Tu., Th. and S., 11 :30. 

[B — 1. Selected Orations from Demosthenes and Lysias. 
Parallel studies in the history of the times. 

Three hours first semester. 

2. Euripides, Alcestis; Sophocles, Antigone; Aes- 
chylus, The Seven Against Thebes. 
Three hours second semester.] 

C — 1. The Gospels of Matthew and John. New Testament 
Grammar. 
Four hours first semester. Tu., W., Th. and F., 3 :30. 

2. The Gospel of Luke and the Apocalypse. 
New Testament Grammar continued. 

Four hours second semester. Tu., W., Th. and F., 
3:30. 



36 Atlantic Christian College 

[D — 1. Selected Epistles, Paul to Jude. 
Three hours first semester. 

2. Selections from the Septuagint. Comparative and 
historical studies. 

Three hours second semester.] 

E — The Message of Greek Art. Illustrated lectures on Greek 
Art, with a study of Tarbell's History of Greek Art. 
Open to all students who are prepared. Provisional. 
One hour weekly throughout the year. W., 9. 

[F — Greek Literature in English Translation. 

For this course see Course on Drama in Department 
of English.] 



Description of Courses of Instruction 37 

Modern Languages 

PROFESSOR CARTER. 



The general objects of instruction in Modern Languages 
are language mastery, literary appreciation, power of inter- 
pretation into mother tongue, and cultured scholarship. Con- 
versation in the foreign tongue is introduced from the first, 
and effort is made to bring forth a correct feeling for the 
language studied. 

GERMAN 

A— 1 and 2. 

Introduction to German literature of eighteenth cen- 
tury — Lessing, Emilia Galotti ; Schiller, Jungfrau von 
Orleans and Maria Stuart; Goethe, Iphigenie, Egmont, 
Tasso, and Goets von Berlichingen. Texts are repro- 
duced in German. Writing German with review of 
Grammar. Three hours throughout the year. W., F. 
and S., 2:30. 

[B— 1 and 2. 

German Literature. Lectures, reports, and reading, 
based on various histories of literature and individual 
work of authors, from the beginnings of German Litera- 
ture to date. A more special study of one or more mas- 
terpieces will be made each semester.] 

[C— 1 and 2. 

German Literature of the nineteenth century. The 
Romantic School. The Novel. The drama and lyrics, 
lectures, collateral reading and written reports by the 
class.] 

FRENCH 

A— 1 and 2. 

Classic prose. First semester — Mme. de la Fayette, 
La Princess de Cleves ; Lesage, Gil Bias ; Voltaire, 



38 Atlantic Christian, College 

Zadig; Chateaubriand, Atala. Selections from Pascal, 
Descartes, Fenelon, La Bruyere. Collateral reading and 
reports. Three hours throughout the year. Tu., Th. 
and Fr., 3 :30. 

[B— 1 and 2. 

Nineteenth Century Literature. Novelists. Read- 
ing from Hugo, Balzac, Sand, Flaubert, Daudet and 
others. History of modern French fiction.] 

SPANISH 

A— 1 and 2. 

Beginners' Course — Pronunciation, grammar, compo- 
sition, conversational drill. Text-books : Bassett, Spanish 
Grammar; Hills, Spanish Tales; Padre Isla, Gil Bias 
de Santillana; Ramos- Aza, Zaragueta. Four hours 
throughout the year. Tu., W., F. and S., 1 :30. 

[B— 1 and 2. 

Intermediate Spanish. Selected texts since 1850. 
Valera, Pepita Jimeniz ; Pereda, Pedro Sanchez ; Perez 
Galdos, Dona Perfecta; Hartzenbusch, La coja y el en- 
cogido. Reproduction of texts in Spanish.] 

[C— 1 and 2. 

Commercial Spanish. Practice in composition of let- 
ters of various types. Business correspondence will 
receive considerable attention.] 



Description of Courses of Instruction 39 

Education 

PRESIDENT SMITH. 



A — 1. General Principles of Education. 

The purpose of this course is to examine the funda- 
mental principles upon which sound educational pro- 
cedure must be based. Such principles have been de- 
rived in the main from the sciences of Anthropology, 
Biology, Physiology, Psychology, and Sociology. It 
includes the discussion of such topics as the bearing of 
the doctrine of Evolution on Education ; the meaning of 
Infancy ; the relation of Psychology and Mental Develop- 
ment; the Doctrine of Formal Discipline; the adjust- 
ment of Educational Procedure to Social Adjustment; 
the various Educational Agencies which influence char- 
acter and development; the educational values of the 
various elements of a curriculum, and the general aim 
of education. 

Three hours. First semester. Prerequisites Psy- 
chology A 1. Tu., Th. and S., 8. 

2 — Principles of Secondary Education. 

This course will deal with the historical Develop- 
ment of the American High School and compare it with 
the Secondary Schools of France and Germany. It will 
treat of the organization, curriculum and place of the 
High School in the educational system of the United 
States. It includes the study of the principles underly- 
ing the social and economic advantages of Secondary 
Education and its adjustment to meet the needs of the 
community which gives it support. 

Three hours. Second semester. Prerequisites Psy- 
chology A 1, and Education A 1. Tu., Th. and S., 8. 



40 Atlantic Christian College 

B — 1. Processes of Education — General. 

This course will cover what is generally termed Prin- 
ciples or Methods of Teaching, and will deal with the 
general principles in both theory and practice. 

Three hours. First semester. Prerequisites Educa- 
tion A 1 and 2. Tu., Th. and S., 9. 

2 — Processes of Secondary Education. 

Continuing Course B — 1. This course will seek to 
apply the principles to the specific subjects of study in 
the High School curriculum and show the student how 
to teach that subject which he is preparing to teach. 

Three hours. Second semester. Prerequisites Edu- 
cation A 1 and 2 and B 1. Tu., Th. and S., 9. 

C — 1. History of Education — General. 

This course will follow Dr. Munroe's text-book and 
use Cubberly's Syllabus with extended reading and 
special reports. 

Two hours. First semester. Prerequisites Psychology 
A 1. W. and F., 8. 

2 — History of Education in the United States. 

This course follows C-l, and calls for the same pre- 
requisites. Dexter's History of Education in the United 
States will be used as a text, and wide reading of State 
and Government documents and reports will be required. 
Special attention will be given to the development of the 
educational system of North Carolina. 

Two hours. Second semester. W. and F., 8. 

D — 1. Educational Psychology. 

This is survey of the original nature of man, together 
with a study of interest and perception, and of the pro- 
cesses by which education can affect the individual. 
Topics : Education, its meaning and aims ; Relation of 



Description of Courses of Instruction 41 

Education to Psychology ; The Instinctive Life of Man, 
its nature, development, value and use; Feeling and 
Emotions, Interest, Perception, Psychology of Learning, 
Association and Memory; Transfer of Training, Judg- 
ment, Belief and Reasoning; Imagination, Development 
of Initiative, etc. 

Three hours. First semester. Prerequisite Courses 
A 1 and 2. Tu., Th. and S., 10 :30. 

2— Child Study. 

This is a continuation of Course A-l, and aims to give 
the student a better knowledge of the child's nature so 
as to be more able to interpret his actions and make use 
of his instincts at the proper time. Text: Kirkpatrick's 
Fundamentals of Child Study. 

Adolescence. 

This course aims to survey the whole sphere of activity 
of the "Teen" or High School age. Topics : The Physi- 
cal and Mental changes of the High School years; the 
Broadening Vision ; the New Self and its Dangers ; the 
Social and Study Habits ; Amusements ; Adaptation of 
the school to the needs of the pupils, etc. 

References: Hall, King, McKeever and others. 

Three hours. Second semester. Prerequisite Courses 
A 1 and 2, and B-l. Tu., Th. and S., 10.30. 

E — 1. Administration and Supervision. 

This course attempts to prepare for both teaching and 
superintending schools. It covers the subjects of Public 
Administration of Schools, school support, the work of 
the Superintendent, the work of the Principal, the work 
of the Teacher, and many related topics. 

The works of Cubberly, Dutton and Sneddon, Bagley, 
Chancellor, will be used and referred to frequently. 

Two hours. First semester. W. and F., 9. 



42 Atlantic Christian College 

2 — School and Class-room Management. 

This course will cover such subjects as The Philosophy 
of School Management, Class Teaching and Manage- 
ment, School Discipline and the like, and seek to find the 
fundamental basis for the right relation between school 
and patron, school and community, parent and teacher, 
teacher and pupil. Required readings from Tompkins, 
Bagley, Perry and Chancellor. 

Two hours. Second semester. W. and P., 9. 

P — 1. Rural Life and Education. 

This is a Seminar course, and will consist of extended 
readings, reports, lectures and discussions. It will also 
include a large bibliography of the subject. Texts: Cub- 
berly, Hart. 

Two hours. First semester. W. and P., 10 :30. 

2 — School Hygiene. 

Dresslar's School Hygiene will be used as a text, and 
the work of medical inspection, intelligence measure- 
ment will be discussed. 

Two hours. Second semester. W. and P., 10 :30. 



Description of Courses of Instruction 43 

Mathematics 

PEOFESSOE HAEPEE. 



A — 1. Solid Geometry. 

Course IV, 1 and 2, is presupposed. Analogies be- 
tween Plane and Solid Geometry are noticed. Original 
work is required. 

Text: Wells and Hart. 

Three hours throughout the year. Tu., Th. and S., 9. 

'A — 2. Plane Trigonometry. 

Numerous formulas are derived and used. The Trigo- 
nometric functions and their applications are studied. 
Problems requiring the solutions of right and oblique 
triangles are solved. 

Text: Wells New Complete Trigonometry. 

Three hours throughout the year. Tu., Th. and S., 9. 

B — 1. College Algebra. 

The work begins with a review of Quadratics, and 
solution of problems. Study is made of theory of equa- 
tions, determinants, permutations and combinations, 
convergence and divergence of series, binomial formula, 
solution of cubic and biquadratic equations. 

Text: Fite's College Algebra. W., P. and S., 11:30. 

Three hours. 

B — 2. Spherical Trigonometry. 

Derivation of the usual formulas is required. Prob- 
lems involving the solutions of right and oblique spheri- 
cal triangles are solved. 

Text: Wells New Complete Trigonometry. 

Three hours. W., F. and S., 11 :30. 



44 Atlantic Christian College 

C — 1 and 2. Analytic Geometry. 

The work in this course consists of a thorough discus- 
sion of the locus of an equation, and a study of the Car- 
tesian method of" representing loci. The several conic 
sections are considered separately. Numerous problems 
are solved. 

Text: Wentworth's Analytic Geometry. 

Three hours. W., F. and S., 11 :30. 
To be alternated with Course B. 

[D — 1 and 2. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Formulse for differentiation are developed and applied 
to the solution of a variety of problems. After develop- 
ing standard forms of integration, attention is given to 
problem-solving, a large number of problems being 
chosen from those which are encountered in the study of 
Physics and Mechanics.] 



Description of Courses of Instruction 45 

Science 

PROFESSOR WHITNEY. 



A — 1 and 2. Chemistry. 

General Chemistry. — The physical and chemical prop- 
erties of the principal metals and non-metals; their 
occurrence in nature, and their economic importance. 
A general knowledge of the methods of employing simple 
experiments is acquired. 

Four hours the year. Tu., W., Th. and F., 1 :30. 

B— 1 and 2. 

Qualitative Analysis. — The student works in the labo- 
ratory under the direction of the instructor, but is thrown 
largely upon his own resources. The more important 
elements are studied in detail until their properties be- 
come familiar, then studied in their group relations, 
separated and identified. Work with unknowns then 
follows, comprising most of the course. 

Two hours the year. F. and S,, 8. 

C — Zoology. 

1. Invertebrate. — This course serves as a good intro- 
duction to scientific Zoology. Much time will be spent 
in the laboratory. The first semester's work will consist 
of (a) Observation, (b) Dissections, and (c) Experi- 
ments upon (1) unicellular animals (Amoeb and Paua- 
moecium) (2) higher invertebrates, such as earth worm 
and cray fish, and embryology and cell division. First 
semester. 

2. Vertebrates. — A continuation of Course A, dealing 
with (1) Frog, (2) Dogfish, (3) Turtle, (4) Cat. 
Second semester. 

Two hours the year. W. and F., 10 :30. 



46 Atlantic Christian College 

D — 1 and 2. Botany. 

This course will give the student a thorough founda- 
tion knowledge of scientific Botany. It includes a study 
of the nowerless as well as of the flowering plants. First 
semester work includes a study of seaweed, fungi, mosses 
and liver warts. The second semester: Ferns, club 
mosses, rushes and seed plants will be considered. The 
following are some of the subjects for lectures and class 
papers: (1) Evolution of the plant body, (2) Origin and 
evolution of sex, (3) Roesitism saprophytism and sym- 
biosis, (4) Evolution of the sporophyte, (5) Reduction 
of the gametophyle, (6) Alteration of generations, (7) 
Flora development, (8) Spermatogeresis, (9) Fertiva- 
tion, (10) Embryology. 

Three hours the year. Tu., Th. and S., 10:30. 

[E — 1 and 2. Biology. 

An advanced course based upon Course A 1 and 2 in 
Zoology, in which a generalization will be made of the 
many facts and principles learned in these previous 
courses. Principles of Heredity and the theory of Evo- 
lution will be studied. Subjects considered are: (1) 
Survey of animal groups in order of increasing com- 
plexity, (2) The idea of a phylogeatic tree, (3) Evi- 
dence of Evolution, (4) Ancestry of Man, (5) History 
of Evolution Idea from Greeks to Darwin, (6) Dar- 
winianism, (7) Variation and Heredity as causes of 
Evolution, (8) Variations, (9) Their inheritability, 
(10) Physical basis for Heredity, (11) Mendals law, 
(12) Eugenic aspects of Evolution and Heredity.] 

[F — 1 and 2. Geology and Mineralogy. 

1. A lecture, laboratory and field course devoted to 
the principles of general and economic Geology, and to a 
study of the rock forming minerals. The formation of 
the earth, its present condition, physical and chemical 
processes which modify its exterior are fully discussed. 



Description of Courses of Instruction 47 

2. A continuation of Course A, dealing principally 
with Historical Geology and the first appearance of life 
upon the earth.] 

[G — 1 and 2. Genetic Psychology. 

Study of the mental development of the individual 
from the biological viewpoints as a basis for education, 
theory and practice. The course discusses physical 
growth and development in their relation to mental de- 
velopment; analysis of the instincts and their modifica- 
tion through response to stimuli. The text is supple- 
mented by outside readings.] 



48 Atlantic Christian College 

Social Science 

PKOFESSOE LAPPIN. 



HISTORY 

A — 1 and 2. Mediaeval History and Civilization. 

An extensive study is made of the empire and papacy, 
and the intellectual, political and religious life of the 
middle ages. Tout's "Empire and Papacy," Lodge's 
"Close of the Middle Ages," and various other authors 
will be supplemented by class-room lectures. 

Two hours the year. W. and E., 8. 

[B — 1 and 2. Modern History and Civilization. 

A rapid survey of the modern period from its begin- 
ning to the present time will be made. Special attention 
will be given to the revolutionary periods and the ex- 
pansion of the various European countries during the 
nineteenth century. Robinson & Beard, Stevens and 
other authors will be used. 

Three hours the year. Tu., Th. and S., 8.] 

C — 1 and 2. The American Church. 

A study of the religious conditions of America and 
the growth of denominationalism. Special attention is 
given to the movement led by the Campbells and their 
co-laborers and to the present religious conditions in 
America. 

One hour the year. W., 3 :30. 

D — 1. The Rise of Christianity. 

A study of the Apostolic period, showing the develop- 
ment and spread of Christianity in the Jewish world, 






Description of Courses of Instruction 49 

the rise and growth of the papal power and the papacy 
during the middle ages. 

Three hours. First semester. Tu., Th. and S., 1 :30. 

2. The Renaissance and Reformation. 

Beginning with the Renaissance, a study is made of 
the reactionary and reforming parties. The reformation 
is studied in its development in Germany and its spread 
through surrounding countries. About twelve hundred 
pages will be covered. 

Three hours. Second semester. Tu., Th. and S., 
1:30. 

E — 1 and 2. Hebreiv History. 

The early development of the Hebrews is traced from 
their tribal into national life, the united kingdom, the 
divided kingdom, the Persian period, the Greek period, 
the Maccabean period. Kent, Riggs and others will be 
used as the basis of the work. 

Two hours the year. W. and F., 1 :30. 

F — 1 and 2. Advanced American History. 

The colonial period, the period of exploration preced- 
ing it, the period of the French War and Revolution, 
the Civil War and reconstruction is studied by the guid- 
ance of such authors as Wilson, Hart, Thwaites. 

Three hours the year. Tu., Th. and S., 3 :30. 

[G — 1 and 2. Industrial and Constitutional History. 

The first half of the work deals with the industrial 
and constitutional history of England, and the second 
half with that of the United States. 

Three hours for the year. Time to be arranged.] 
4 



50 Atlantic Christian College 

SOCIOLOGY 

A — 1. A Course in Pure Sociology. 

A study is made of the fundamental laws controlling 
human action, the behavior of crowds and social psych- 
ology. Blackmar & Gillin, Cooley, Ross, LeBon, McDou- 
gal and others will be used. 

2. Applied Sociology. 

Special attention will be given to American charities, 
but a survey of other charities will be given brief atten- 
tion. Warner, Henderson, Devine, Richmond, Hoi 
lander and others will be consulted. 

Two hours the year. W. and F., 9. 

[B — 1. Rural Sociology. 

A study of rural conditions, with the aid of rural sur- 
veys is made. The rural school, the rural church, the 
rural family and kindred topics are studied. The 
special aim is to acquaint the student with rural condi- 
tions of the Southern States. 

Two hours. Second semester. Tu. and Th., 2:30.] 

[C— 1. The Public Mind. 

An intensive study is made of the behavior of group 
forms of society — the mob, the street crowd, the relig- 
ious crowd, and various types of collective action are 
considered. Ross, LeBon, McDougal, and current litera- 
ture on the topic will be used. Open only to students 
who have had Sociology "A." 

Three hours. First semester. Tu., Th. and S., 
10:30.] 

[D — 1. The American Newspaper. 

This course is an investigation into the influence of 
the newspaper upon society. Attention is given to the 






Description of Courses of Instruction 51 

newspaper's function as a public voice and as a means 
of expressing the sentiments and feelings of the people. 
Open only to those who have had Sociology "A." 

Two hours. Second semester. W. and F., 10 :30.] 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

[A-l. 

Primitive man is studied with special attention to his 
origin, mental and moral traits and his tribal and family 
life. Tylor, Keane, Sumner, Thomas and other authors 
will be used. 

Three hours. First semester. Tu., Th. and S., 9.] 

ECONOMICS 

A — 1 and 2. Principles of Economics. 

The whole field of economics is treated, the effort 
being to give the student a knowledge of business life 
that will be of benefit to him in any occupation. Special 
attention is given to topics which are related to modern 
industrial life. Taussig, Seligman, Ely and others will 
be used as texts. 

Two hours the year. W. and F., 11 :30. 

£B — 1. Rural Economics. 

The course treats the subject of political economy as 
related to the rural community. Rural credits, co-opera- 
tive buying and selling among farmers, the work of the 
Bankers', Farmers' Association, Farmers' Clubs and 
kindred topics will be studied. 

Two hours. First semester. W. and F., 2 :30.] 

C — 1. Comparative Government. 

This is a course in the study of the political forms of 
other countries in comparison to those of our own 
country. 

Two hours. Second semester. Tu. and Th., 11 :30. 



52 Atlantic Christian College 

Philosophy and Religious Education 

PROFESSOR CASE. 



PHILOSOPHY. 

A — 1. General Psychology. 

It is the aim of this course to acquaint the student 
with the essential facts and the fundamental laws of 
human behavior. This course is necessary as an intro- 
duction to the more advanced courses in Psychology. 
Topics studied: Habit, Instinct, Attention, Sensation, 
Perception, Imagination, Memory, Association, Reason- 
ing, Feeling, Emotion, and some of the broader aspects 
of the Nervous System. References : James, Thomdike, 
Angell, Royce, Pillsbury, and Tichener, etc. 

Two hours throughout the year. Tu. and Th., 8. 

2. Logic. 

This course includes the principles and rules of de- 
ductive reasoning with concrete problems involving these 
rules, the laws and methods of inductive reasoning with 
a large selection of problems from the history of science 
illustrating these methods, a philosophical treatment of 
the nature and laws of thought. 

Two hours. First semester. W. and F., 8. 
One hour. Second semester. S., 8. 

3. Ethics. 

A three-fold treatment of the subject. The develop- 
ment of moral life, a critical discussion of the theories 
of ethics and a discussion of the practical problems of 
moral, political and religious life is the course in outline. 

One hour. First semester. S., 8. 

Two hours. Second semester. W. and F., 8. 



Description of Courses of Instruction 53 

[B — 1 and 2. History of Philosophy. 

This course is a development of thought from the 
Greek origin of Philosophy to the present time, in its 
relation to the history and the civilization of the various 
periods. Especial attention will be given to the modern 
tendencies, including the work of James, Eucken and 
Bergson. Text: Roger's History of Philosophy, read- 
ings from Weber, Hoffding, Ueberweg, James, Eucken, 
and Bergson. 

Two hours throughout the year. 2 :30. Prerequisite 
Philosophy A.] 

[C — 1 and 2. History and Philosophy of Religion. 

This course is a study of problems common to Phi- 
losophy and Religion. It includes a brief history of 
Religions with a more detailed study of the Christian 
Religion. This study will make an examination of the 
development of the Papacy, the Protestant Church, and 
the present problems of religion. Lectures, readings 
and reports. 

Two hours throughout the year. 2 :30. Prerequi- 
sites Philosophy A and B.] 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

A — 1. Principles of Religious Education. 

The course will emphasize the place of character in 
education. Education is thought of as a unitary process, 
and the term Religious Education is used to designate, 
not a part of general education, but the essential char- 
acter of any truly general development of the human 
person. Child nature is analyzed and synthesized with 
a view to tracing the religious impulse through the ado- 
lescent period. The Christian conception of childhood is 
studied. 

Two hours the year. Tu. and Th., 1 :30. 



54 Atlantic Christian College 

2. Means and Methods of Religious Education. 

The great educational institutions, the Church School, 
Societies and Clubs, Young People's Societies, Christian 
Academies and Colleges, State Schools, and the Family, 
are studied. The student becomes familiar with their 
materials and methods, and is taught to select, organize 
and utilize that which is most feasible and scientific for 
his particular field. 

Two hours the year. W. and F., 1 :30. 

3. The Evolution of the Church School. 

From the general conception of religion as a develop- 
ing personality, the evolution of the modern church 
school is traced by means of the record of the history of 
religion. The various ways in which the Church School 
adapts itself to the needs of the present century life is 
emphasized. 

One hour the year. S. 

Missions 
B — 1. Principles of Missions. 

The aim of this course is to teach some of the main 
principles of the mission movement on which it rests in 
its appeal at home and its work abroad. Missions are 
taught as primary and essential in Christianity, as both 
a privilege and a duty. The course is designed to give 
the church worker the laws of the growth of the king- 
dom, and in them a basis for all Christian and social 
effort. 

First semester. Tu., Th. and S., 11 :30. 

2. The Nonr-Christian Fields. 

The life of the people in the non-Christian world, 
their historical, immediate and future needs is gleaned 
from the sources available. A view, by means of sketches 






Description of Courses of Instruction 55 

of mission fields and the result of mission work in life, 
is given of the power of Christianity to draw the pagan 
world into the abundant life. Extended readings in mis- 
sionary literature and reports will be required. 

Second semester. Tu., Th. and S., 11 :30. 

C — 1 and 2. Work and Worship of the Church. 

This course has to do with applied Christianity. The 
ways and means by which the Gospel of Christ is brought 
to bear upon the lives of men. The local congregation at 
work with an efficient auxiliary, a trained corps of work- 
ers and competent leadership is the goal which is kept 
before the student. Special attention is given to such 
problems as (a) work and worship of the child and the 
youth; (b) missionary interests — historical and practi- 
cal; (c) the place of music in the worship ; (d) enriching 
the order of service; (e) the administration of the rites 
and ceremonies ; (f ) the training of officers, church book- 
keeping, and church finances. Text-book work, lectures 
and readings. 

The year. W. and F., 11 :30. 



56 Atlantic Christian College 

Biblical Literature and Doctrine 

DOCTOR MARTIN. 



The first great need of the earnest Christian is a knowl- 
edge of the facts of "The Book," the next is to see the real 
meaning of these. The effort is made to study the Sacred 
Books as literature, also to find in them as sources the history 
of their people. 

A — 1 and 2. Old Testament Literature and Analysis. 

This course is designed to be an introduction to the 
study of, and an inquiry into the structure, origin and 
history of the Old Testament. It aims to lay the foun- 
dation of an understanding of the life and work of 
Jesus. The analytical work is designed to thoroughly 
familiarize the student with the contents of each Old 
Testament book. Text-book, lectures, readings and re- 
ports. 

Three hours throughout the year. Tu., W., Th., 8. 



B — 1 and 2. New Testament Literature and Analysis. 

In a general way this course is similar to Course A, 
but using the ISTew Testament instead of the Old as a 
basis for study. A New Testament chronology will be 
worked out, covering the life of Christ, the life of Paul 
and the Apostolic Age. A complete analysis of each of 
the books will be required so as to fully acquaint the 
student with the whole content of the ISTew Testament 
Literature. 

Text-book, lectures, readings and reports. 

Three hours throughout the year. Tu., W. and Th., 9. 

C — 1 and 2. Old Testament Teachings and Institutions. 

This course constitutes an inquiry into what the Old 
Testament teaches concerning God and man and their 



Description of Courses of Instruction 57 

relation to each other ; of sin and salvation, and the insti- 
tutions and means by which the Divine and human 
relations were expressed toward each other; the fore- 
shadowings of the Christ ; the great messages of the men 
of God in the ages preceding the coming of the Christ. 
Emphasis will be placed upon the social messages of the 
books to the ages for which they were written. 

Three hours throughout the year. Tu., W. and Th., 
10:30. 

D — 1 and 2. New Testament Teachings and Institutions. 

This course is in general like Course C. In it special 
attention will be given to the Christ as the goal of Old 
Testament Prophecy and expectation; to salvation and 
its fullness of meaning in Christ; to the church as the 
agency through which the message of life is to be brought 
to the world. 

Three hours throughout the year. Tu., W. and Th., 
11:30. 

THE MINISTER AND HIS WORK 

A — 1. The Minister as a Preacher. 

In this course the functions of the ministry, the 
supreme aim of all preaching, the central theme of the 
sermon, the minister's study, the Generic idea of the 
sermon, the ideal "Constants" of the sermon, the ideal 
"Immediates" of the sermon, the ideal "Cardinals" of 
the sermon, the delivery of the sermon, the text, history 
of the use of the text, sermon divisions, the proposition, 
the development of the theme, the conclusion, sermon 
plans as illustrative of different kinds of discussion, will 
be studied. 

2. The Minister as a Pastor. 

This study will include the pastor's work as it is re- 
lated to his church, his social relations to his congrega- 



58 Atlantic Christian College 

tion, the finances of the church, the benevolences of the 
church, the young people of his congregation, what the 
church may expect of the pastor; the pastor's relation 
to the community, his relation to reforms, his relation 
to the social life of those outside of his congregation; 
the use of sermons adapted to community conditions; 
New Testament ideals. 

Three hours. Tu., W. and Th., 2 :30. 



SCHEDULE OF COLLEGE CLASSES 



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62 Atlantic Christian College 

The High School 

E. L. Bakham, A.M., Principal. 



This department is under the general supervision of the 
heads of departments in the college. It is designed to meet 
the needs of those who are deficient in some or all of the 
requirements for entrance to the freshman year in college, 
and to give a general education to such as are unable to com- 
plete a college course. We are striving to make this the most 
thorough and conscientious secondary school in the State. To 
this end the high school curriculum has been strengthened 
and enlarged to meet in every particular the requirements of 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, 
and enriched in such way as to more effectually prepare those 
who finish this course to be more efficient members of the 
community of which they may be a part. 

Combinations of secondary and college studies may be 
made with approval of the committee on assignment. Those 
who do not contemplate completing a regular college course, 
but who desire to fit themselves for technical or professional 
courses are offered a wide field of opportunity. 

High School students have the same literary society, library 
and other general privileges as those in the college. 

It will be necessary to refer back to the graded schools such 
pupils as are unprepared to do the work as outlined for the 
high school first year class. 

Description of Courses 

ENGLISH 

I. Grammar, Composition, and Literature. First year. 

1 and 2. This course will make a careful review of 
the parts of speech, and their relations in the sentence 
will be given, and the study of sentences in a more com- 



The High School 63 

prehensive way will be emphasized. Some time will be 
given to the study of Literature for the purpose of 
acquainting the student with the best forms and styles 
of language. Grammar two hours, literature two hours, 
composition one hour throughout the year — 36 weeks. 
Required. 

Text : Kittridge and Farley, advanced English Gram- 
mar. 

II. Rhetoric, Composition and Literature. Second year. 

1 and 2. Elementary Rhetoric. Review of punctua- 
tion, spelling, letter-writing, use of words, sentences and 
paragraph structure. Study of figure of speech and 
versification. Class exercises and themes given to illus- 
trate and enforce text. 

A complete study of narration, description, exposi- 
tion, and argumentation. Themes chosen from students' 
personal experience, general knowledge, and reading in 
literature. 

Detailed study of a few chosen English Classics. 

Ill — 1 and 2. American Literature and Composition. Third 
year. 

The aim of this course is to arouse the student's 
interest in American Literature. The work consists in 
text-book instruction in the changing circumstance of 
that literature and the literary careers of the more im- 
portant American authors, and in the reading and study 
of the works of the authors discussed. The works will 
be, as far as possible, those on the current College 
Entrance Requirement list. One hour a week will be 
devoted to the study and practice of compositions. 

Texts : Mathew's Introduction to American Literature, 
and Part III of Miller's Practical English Composition. 

Eive hours per week — 36 weeks. 



64 Atlantic Christian College 

TV — 1 and 2. English Literature and Composition. Fourth 
year. 

In this course English literature is treated as Ameri- 
can literature is in Course III. The College Entrance 
Requirements for study are completed in this year. One 
hour a week will be devoted to the study and practice 
of composition. 

Eive hours per week — 36 weeks. 



The High School 65 

Ancient Languages 



LATIN 



I — 1. First year Latin. Text: Pearson. 
Five hours weekly. 

2. First year Latin completed. 
Five hours weekly. 

II — 1. Caesar's Gallic War, Books I and II. 

Text: Gunnison and Harley. Review and continued 
study of forms and syntax. Composition. 
Five hours weekly. 

2. Caesar's Gallic War, Books III and IV, and selec- 
tions from Books V and VI. Continued composition. 
Parallel readings in history of the times. Illustrated 
lectures. 

Five hours weekly. 

Ill — 1. Cicero's Orations against Cataline I-IV. Compo- 
sition based upon the text. Parallel readings in history 
of the times. Illustrated lectures. 
Five hours weekly. 

2. Cicero's Orations, Citizenship of Archais and Ma- 
nillian Law, with selected letters ; or Sallust — a contin- 
uation of Course III. 

Five hours weekly. 

IV— 1. Virgil's xFneid, Books I, II, III. 

Studies of meter. A brief survey of the life of the 
poet as related to his times. 
Five hours weekly. 

5 



66 Atlantic Christian College 

2. Virgil's ^Eneid, Books IV, V, VI. 
Courses III and IV may alternate. 
Five hours weekly. 

GREEK 

I — 1. Beginning Greek. White's First Greek Book. 
Five hours first semester. 

2. White's First Greek Book completed. Xenophon's 
Anabasis begun. 

Five hours second semester. 

II — 1. Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I, II, III. Composi- 
tion. 

Four hours first semester. 

2. Xenophon's Anabasis, Book IV. Selections from 
the Gospel of St. Mark. Composition. 

Four hours second semester. 



The High School 67 

Modern Languages 



GERMAN 

I— 1 and 2. 

Beginner's Course. Oral lessons based on the Gouin 
Series plan. Walter and Krause, Grammar and Reader ; 
Zinnecker, Deutsch fur Anf anger. German is the 
medium of the class-room from the first. Study of ele- 
mentary grammar. 

II— 1 and 2. 

Advanced first year German. Kreuz und Quer durch 
Deutsche Lande; Immensee ; Leberecht Huhnchen. 
Practice in composition, conversation and review of the 
conjugations, declensions and rules of syntax. 

I— 1 and 2. FRENCH 

Beginner's course. Eraser and Squair, French Gram- 
mar and Reader.. Contes et Legends, Vol. I ; Les plus 
Julia Contes de Fees; La Tulipe Noire. 

II— 1 and 2. 

Modern prose, first semester: Rapid reading from 
modern writers. Review of grammar. Composition. 
Second semester: Modern comedies. French oral and 
written reproduction of the texts read. 

History 

I. Ancient History. First year. 

1 and 2. This course covers the history of the world 
from the earliest times to the time of Charles the Great. 
It is studied and presented from the industrial and 
economic as well as the political viewpoint. The text 
used : "The Ancient World," by Willis Mason West, will 



68 Atlantic Christian College 

occupy the class for five hours per week — 36 weeks. 
Frequent papers will be required. Required. 

II — Medieval and Modern History. Second year. 

1 and 2. The text: "The Modern World," by Pro- 
fessor West, takes up the world story where his Ancient 
World left off and brings history down to date, including 
the basic causes of the present great world conflict of 
people, nations and their interests. The economic and 
industrial phases of history receive constant attention 
and emphasis. Five hours per week — 36 weeks. 

Ill — English History. Third year. 

Aside from encouraging interest in English history 
from every point of view for its own sake, this course 
gives special emphasis to the interest of English history 
as the real forerunner of the settlement and development 
of the American continent. Forms of government are 
so fully illustrated that they call for marked attention 
as helping us to understand the nature of the colonies 
and the governments they set up. Five hours per week — 
36 weeks. 

IV — American History and Government. Fourth year. 

This course aims to equip the student with a thorough 
understanding of the political, constitutional, industrial, 
economical and social development of the United States, 
showing the evolution and expansion of our national 
life, interests and government. Five hours per week — 
36 weeks. Required. 



The High School 69 

Mathematics 



I — 1 and 2. Arithmetic. 

A thorough review of the subject is given. Especial 
emphasis is placed on analysis of problems, accuracy of 
work, and application to business. 

II — 1 and 2. Algebra. 

A good working knowledge of the principles of arith- 
metic is required. Drill work on the elementary prin- 
ciples of algebra up to Quadratics makes up this course. 

Text : Wentworth-Smith. 

Ill — 1 and 2. Algebra. 

High school algebra completed. The work includes 
Quadratics, Involution and Evolution, Theory of Ex- 
ponents, Binomial Theorem, and advanced work in solu- 
tion of problems. Thoroughness and accuracy are em- 
phasized. 

Text: Wentworth-Smith. 

IV — 1 and 2. Plane Geometry. 

Five books. The usual propositions are considered. 
Reasoning along Geometrical lines is carefully guided 
and developed. Especial attention is given to original 
demonstration. 

Text : Wells and Hart. 

V — 1. Solid Geometry. 

The mastery of Plane Geometry is presupposed. 
Methods of Plane Geometry are continued with original 
work emphasized. 

Text : Wells and Hart. 



70 Atlantic Christian College 

2. Plane Trigonometry. 

The trigonometric functions and their applications are 
studied. Problems involving the use of logarithms, and 
including solutions of right and oblique triangles, are 
solved. 

Text : Wells and Hart Complete Trigonometry. 



The High School 71 

Science 



I — First Year. 

1. General Science. — The purpose of this course is 
two-fold. First, to give the student a good general idea 
of the field covered by modern science; and, second, to 
determine the student's fitness for scientific work before 
he undertakes any of the courses of a specialized nature. 
The course introduces the young student to the more 
elementary facts of Botany, Zoology, Biology, Geology, 
Physics and Chemistry. The wide range of subjects of 
course makes detailed knowledge impossible, but it will 
give a comprehensive view of scientific work and also 
show the relationship existing between all branches of 
Science. First semester. 

2. Nature Study and Life. — This course should fol- 
low Course 1, as it has the same purpose. General 
Science, however, emphasizes the physical sciences, 
whereas, this course lays particular stress upon the Bio- 
logical sciences. Field trips and the gathering of speci- 
mens will be an important part of the course. Second 
semester. 

3. Physiography. — This course alternating with (1), 
is intended to introduce the student, (1) to the form of 
the earth and its relation to the solar system, (2) the 
atmosphere, its composition, temperature, pressure, 
weather changes, (3) the ocean, its temperature, move- 
ment, geologic activities, (4) the land, its formation and 
geologic changes. Offered every other year. 

4. Commercial Geography. — This course may alter- 
nate with Course 2, and will attempt to familiarize the 
student with the general movements of commerce and the 
laws governing such movements ; to provide a knowledge 
of the chief products of the different parts of the earth 



72 Atlantic Christian College 

and the localities where such products are mainly con- 
sumed, and to give information concerning the chief 
industrial and trade centers. 

II — Second Year. 

1. Physiology. — The object of this course is to develop 
an appreciation of the human body. This necessitates 
a knowledge of its structure and the work of its parts 
separately and as a whole. A knowledge of this kind 
is a necessary foundation for advanced study, and should 
be the possession of every intelligent person, for with- 
out it effective co-operation in modern methods of heal- 
ing as practiced by physicians is impossible. 

2. Sanitation and Hygiene. — This course logically fol- 
lows Course 1, and pays especial attention to the care of 
the body. A study of drainage and sewerage disposal is 
given attention in order that health may be safeguarded 
and not impaired, simply on account of ignorance or 
neglect of the simple rules for a wholesome physical 
environment. 

Ill — Agriculture. Third Year. 

1. The object of this course is to open to the students' 
view some of the vast possibilities of modern farming 
when carried on in a thoroughly scientific manner. An 
effort will be made to link up the known facts of the 
laboratory and scientific theory in such a way that the 
student will see the advantages of such information and 
study the problems of the farm with the same careful 
observation of small, but important details, that he uses 
in the laboratory. The course will deal principally with 
general farm management, up-to-date methods of har- 
vesting, care of cattle, orchards, etc. First semester. 

2. This course, a continuation of III-l, is more de- 
tailed. It will pay special attention to the nature of dif- 
ferent kinds of soils and their value for various products, 
to fertilizers, to principles of crop rotation, soil bacteria, 
field crops and management. Second semester. 



The High School 73 

IV — Physics. Fourth Year. 

1. Mechanics, Molecular physics and heat comprise 
the subjects in this course. Extensive use will be made 
of the laboratory, together with a well kept note- book. 

2. Electricity, magnetism, sound and light. This 
course is the continuation of Course 1, and needs no 
further description, as the same method will be pursued. 

V — 1 and 2. Chemistry. Fourth Year. 

The object of this course is to familiarize the student 
with as large a number of the principles of chemistry as 
possible, and at the same time train him in the applica- 
tion of these principles to the world of fact and phe- 
nomena in which he lives. The student performs the 
experiments himself under the direct supervision of the 
instructor. At least four laboratory periods are required 
each week. This course will be given in alternate years 
with Physics. Physics or Chemistry is required for 
graduation. 

On the completion of the 16 units of this school selected 
under the supervision of the Assignment Committee for the 
High School, a High School diploma will be granted. 



74 Atlantic Christian College 

Domestic Science 



It is with the special object in view of fitting our students 
to become creators and preservers of the home that Atlantic 
Christian College offers a department of Domestic Science. 

In the education of women there is no other subject that 
should claim more attention or be of more importance than 
that of home-making. The trend of modern education for 
women is toward a thorough understanding of home-making. 

This department has for its purpose the training of the 
student in the art of home-making, and includes a thorough 
study of foods. This course receives consideration from the 
standpoint of convenience, economy and health. 

The equipment is modern and ample, and the student uses 
up-to-date and practical methods in her cooking. 

The work is planned to extend over two years. 

First Year. 
I — Cooking. First Semester. 

(a) A study of the production, manufacture and com- 
position of typical foods; their classification according 
to the food principles. 

(b) A study of the principles involved in the cleaning 
and caring for the various sorts of utensils and materials 
found in the kitchen. 

(c) A study of the fundamental scientific principles 
underlying the cookery processes and their application 
in the cooking of typical foods. 

Second Semester. 

2. A continuation of Course I, with the addition of 
the following: 

(a) A study of the comparison and nutritive value of 
foods ; simple food chemistry, diet and dietaries. 



The High School 75 

(b) Special attention paid to preparation and serving. 
Table equipment, setting the table and serving are care- 
fully studied and practiced. 

Second Yeak. 
II — First Semester. 

Continuation of food study, with the addition of: 
1. Household management, expenditure for food ; buy- 
ing and shopping methods ; menus ; balanced meals ; rela- 
tion to nutrition and costs. 

2. Second Semester. 

(a) Applied dietaries; invalid cookery; fancy cook- 
ery ; methods of preparation and garnishing. 

(b) Planning and serving of plain and fancy meals. 

Girls may substitute these courses for Physics, Chemistry 
and Agriculture. 



76 Atlantic Christian College 

Bible Study 



First Year. 

Life of Christ. 

One hour per week — 18 weeks. Stalker's Life of 
Christ will be used for the text with supplementary work 
from the New Testament, and numerous outlines, Bible 
dictionaries, maps, etc. 

Life of Paul. 

One hour per week — 18 weeks. Stalker's Life of 
Paul is the text used for this course. Readings from 
Farrar and other writers and copious references to the 
ISTew Testament and many reference works. 

Second Year. 
Old Testament Boohs. 

The study of this year is by the aid of a good text, 
"Bible Study by Books," and continues throughout the 
year — one hour each week. An endeavor will be made 
in this year to give the student a general grasp of the 
content and aim of each of the books of the Old Testa- 
ment. 

Third Year. 

New Testament by Books. 

This course is a continuation of the text used in the 
first year and completes the book. The general aim and 
purpose is similar. It is followed by a course in Early 
Church History. Both books are completed in this year. 
Ten lessons will be given in J. Patterson Smythe's work 
on "How we got our Bible." One hour per week — 36 
weeks. 



The High School 77 

Fourth Year. 

1. Hebrew History. 

Here an effort will be made to indicate to the student 
the important place the Hebrews, as a people, have occu- 
pied in the world history. One hour per week — 18 
weeks. 

2. New Testament Times. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with 
the conditions prevailing when the New Testament was 
being written, and the relation of the New Testament 
Religion to the history of the time. One hour per 
week — 18 weeks. 



78 Atlantic Christian College 

School of Music 

Miss Ivy May Smith, Director. 



FOREWORD 

Music, as an art study, is a great educator. To study with 
the ambitious desire to master it, we must direct the thoughts 
of those musical students who feel the desire for a broader, 
deeper and more general knowledge of the art, in such a 
manner as to create more real love and zeal for what is beau- 
tiful, and then, only after long and patient toil, do they 
realize what a source of intellectual and artistic pleasure it 
gives to us. With how much more real pleasure would the 
majority of music students devote themselves to their tasks 
did they fully realize and understand what music is. 

It has often been said, "in music the most infinite and pro- 
found mysteries are revealed and placed outside us, as a 
gracious, marvelous globe, the very secret of the soul is 
brought forth and set in audible words." 

AIM AND EQUIPMENT 

The aim of the School of Music of Atlantic Christian Col- 
lege is broad and far-reaching. It wishes to create in its 
students a desire for knowledge of the highest possible stand- 
ard ; to develop such desire in the right direction, surrounding 
its pupils with musical atmosphere just as far as it is possible 
to do so ; to educate its pupils On broad lines and get the best 
results obtainable in the shortest possible time. 

It is essential for students of the School of Music to receive 
training in the Liberal Arts School, that they may have 
sufficient knowledge and understanding to become thorough 
and capable students of both the science and appreciation of 
the art. 

The school is well equipped throughout with splendid 
pianos. The practice rooms are furnished with upright 



School of Music 79 

pianos in good tune and repair. The studios are large, com- 
fortable and attractive for teaching. Several of them contain 
two pianos. The Auditorium, where all recitals are given, 
contains a fine Concert Grand piano and a new upright piano. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The School of Music offers thorough and concise courses 
in Piano, Voice and Violin, along with such courses as are 
indispensable to the educated musician of today: General 
Theory, Harmony, Counterpoint, Composition, Form and 
Analysis, Appreciation of Music, Sight-singing, Philosophy 
of Music, Ensemble playing and Orchestration. 

The prescribed course of study in all departments, places 
emphasis upon a comprehensive study of the modern systems 
of technic and compositions of the Classic, Romantic and 
Modern periods. The course of study for piano is systemati- 
cally divided into six grades: two grades of Academic work 
and four years of Collegiate work, offering two distinct 
courses — the Teacher's Course and the Artist's Course. At 
the beginning of the Junior Collegiate year, the work will be 
molded according to the pupil's intention. If he is fitting 
himself for teaching, he will receive special instruction along 
lines of pedagogy; or should he wish to become a concert 
pianist, particular attention will be given to accumulating a 
repertoire of solos. A wide range of musical literature will 
be required along either course. The Leschetizky technic is 
taught. 

Piano Course of Study 



JUNIOR ACADEMIC 

The first technique — acquirement of proper hand position 
and different kinds of touch and gesture. Musical notation, 
elementary scale-playing, and ear-training. Kohler Prac- 
tical Method Book I; Gurlitt Opus 228; Biehl Opus 30; 
Wolff Opus 37; Loeschorn Opus 65, Books I, II, III; Du- 



80 Atlantic Christian College 

vernoy Op. 176; Sonatines by Clementi, Lichner, Dussek; 
Kullak Kinderscenen and Sonatines. Easy salon pieces by 
Englemann, Orth, Krogmann, Gurlitt, Sartorio, Ducelle, 
Eilenberg and others. Memorizing required. 

SENIOR ACADEMIC 

Technical work suited to the grade. Relationship of keys, 
chords and period structure. Embellishments and scale-play- 
ing . Arpeggios ; Dorring Octave School ; Schmitt, five-finger 
studies; etudes by Strelezki, Op. 100, Book II, Loeschorn, 
Czerny, Heller, Brauer, Cramer and others. Schumann, 
Album for the Young, and Scenes of Childhood ; Bach's Lit- 
tle Preludes and Fugues, Schubert Album, Handel Album, 
Sonatines by Kullak, Beethoven and others. Miscellaneous 
pieces by Gautier, Merkel, Schutte, Mozart, Lichner, Becker, 
Coverly, Pacher, Englemann and others. Memorizing con- 
tinued. 

COLLEGIATE COURSE 

Freshman Year. 

Technical work suited to the grade. Handrock's Mechani- 
cal Studies; Kullak, School of Octaves, Opus 48, Book I; 
Bach, Inventions and French Suites; Sonatas by Haydn, 
Mozart; Loeschorn, Opus 66, Books I, II, III; Heller, Opus 
45, 46, 47; Czerny, School of Velocity; Bertini, Opus 32; 
Cramer, and other studies. Gavottes by Bach, Gluck, Rameau, 
Corelli, Handel, and others; Mendelssohn, Song Without 
Words; Chopin, Waltzes; Pieces by Godard, Mills, Coverly, 
Schubert, Schumann, Moszkowski, Schytte, and others. Mem- 
orizing required. 

Sophomore Year. 

All forms of technic; Octave studies by Low, Schytte, 
Wolff, Opus 243 ; Etudes by Heller, Cramer, Jensen, Bertini, 
Czerny, Hoellander, and others; Bach, English Suites, Ital- 
ian Concerto; Sonatas by Beethoven; Advanced Sonatas by 
Mozart; Chopin, Mazurkas, Nocturnes; Shubert Impromp- 



School of Music 81 

tus; Schytte Opus 22 ; Schutt Opus 41. Miscellaneous pieces 
by Mendelssohn, Raff, Schumann, Grieg, Nevins, Godard and 
others. Concerto by Haydn, Mozart, or Weber. 

Junior Year. 

Advanced technical work. Czerny School of Virtuosos, 
Bach's Well-Tempered Clavichord, easier selections, Kohler 
Opus 112; Clementi, Gradus ad Parnassum; Damm, Wegzer 
Kemsf ertigkit ; Kullak, Octave School Book II, Beethoven, 
Sonatas; Scarlatti, Sonatas; Chopin, Preludes, Polonaises; 
Dvorak Opus 98; Miscellaneous pieces by Vogrich, Nicode, 
Sgambati, Moszkowski, Bendel, Handel, Weber, Schumann, 
and others. Concerto by Weber, Mendelssohn, Mozart or 
Hummel. Memorizing required. 

Senior Year — Artist's Course. 

Tausig daily exercises ; Pf eiffer, Virtuosen studien ; Bach's 
Well-tempered Clavichord; Chopin, Etudes, Impromptus, 
Ballads; Holleander, Studies for the left hand, Opus 31, 
Book III ; Beethoven, Sonatas ; Liszt, Etudes and Rhapso- 
dies; concert pieces by Liszt, Grieg, Wieniawski and others. 
Concerto by Mendelssohn, Listz, Grieg, Schumann, Saint 
Saens. Memorizing required. 

Senior Year — Teacher's Course. 

Selections from the above required. Special pedagogical 
work, history and evolution of the pianoforte and technic, 
science of fingering, normal ways and means, and other 
specialties discussed. 



82 Atlantic Christian College 

Course of Study in Voice Culture and 
Singing 

True cultivation of the voice consists in the development 
of pure tone and its easy, natural use and control in singing. 
Correct use of the breath, intonation, attack, legato, accent, 
phrasing and enunciation are the leading features. 

The greatest attention will be given to the special needs of 
each individual, and the course of study will be selected 
according to the requirements of the student. 

Freshman Year. 

Correct breathing, tone-placing and tone formation, dis- 
tinct enunciation, and pure vowel-color, resonance, diction, 
and declamation. Studies by Behnke and Pearce, Abt, Con- 
cone, Marchesi, Sieber and others. Songs of moderate diffi- 
culty. 

Sophomore Year. 

Fundamental tone-work continued. Advanced scales, arpeg- 
gio and coloratu studies. Studies by Behnke and Pearce, 
Bardogni, Spicker, Sieber, English, French, German songs, 
easy operatic and oratorio arias. 

Junior Year. 

Tone-work continued. Treatment of vowels and conso- 
nants, cadenza, mordentes, Lampertis "Bravura," studies and 
others. Operatic and oratorio arias. Songs of English, Ger- 
man and French composers continued. Ensemble singing, 
with special reference to the church service. 

Senior Year — Artist's Course. 

Difficult studies in vocal technique. Artistic interpreta- 
tion of songs and arias of the literature of all schools, in the 
original language. Studies, repertoire of songs for gradua- 
tion. 



School of Music 83 

Teacher's Course. 

Pedagogy and theory of teaching, hygiene and vocal physi- 
ology in addition to Senior requirements for graduation. 
Thesis. 



Course of Study in Violin 

The course in Violin instruction will include four col- 
legiate years of work. In the Freshman year the pupil will 
acquire a thorough foundation in technic, correct position in 
holding the instrument, and free use of the bow arm. Etudes 
by Wohlfart, Kazer, Mazas, Dont, together with such solos as 
the pupil may adequately master, are studied. 

In the advanced grades, bowing and other technical studies 
by Corsoti, Sauret, Sevok, Etudes by Rode, Leonard, Alard, 
Beugh, with concert pieces, are studied and memorized. 



Public School Music 

There is a constantly increasing demand for thoroughly 
prepared and competent supervisors and teachers of Public 
School Music. It calls for more particular specialization 
than almost any other branch taught in the public school of 
today. The teacher should have the ability to adapt the sub- 
ject to the needs of the individual student, and at the same 
time treat the subject as class work. 

Applicants for the work must pass a special examina- 
tion in piano playing, for general musicianship, and in sing- 
ing, as applied to children's voices. If the applicant is lack- 
ing in any branch of the work, such deficiency may be made 
up in private lessons. 

The time to complete the course is two years. 

Subjects included in the course are: Rote-singing, Sight- 
singing, Ear-training, the development of the child voice, and 
its care, melody writing, songs best adapted for children, in- 



84 Atlantic Christian College 

terpretation of songs. Part songs, methods of teaching, 
chorus, orchestral instruments. Treatment of monotones. 
School management. Proper seating for blending of voices in 
grades and high school. The theory and practice of the work 
is exhaustively taught from every viewpoint. 



Theoretical Courses 

I — General Theory. 

It is the purpose of the General Theory class to discuss 
such subjects as are frequently overlooked by the private 
teacher, as her time is usually limited. 

The topics chiefly touched upon embrace: 
Acoustics ; 

Qualities and character of musical sound ; 
Pitch and perception ; 

Orchestra instruments and their tone quality ; 
Musical terminology; 
Scales ; 
Intervals ; 

Meters and metrical construction ; 
^Notation ; 

Laws governing rhythm, accent and phrasing; 
Embellishments ; 
Chord formation; 
Inversions ; 
Melody-writing. 

II — Harmony. 

Treats of the laws governing — 
Triads and their Inversions ; 
Chords of Sevenths, Secondary Sevenths, and Chords 

of Mnth; 
Cadences ; 
Modulation ; 



School of Music 85 

Suspension ; 

Harmonizing of simple basses and sopranos ; 
Harmonization of figures and unfigured basses ; 
Writing of easy melodies. 

Ill — Poem and Analysis. 

Topics to be studied : 
Motive ; 
Phrase ; 

Sentence of period; 
Song form; 
Eondo ; 
Sonata ; 
Canon ; 
Fugue. 

IV — History of Music. 

Brief outline of the work done in the course: 
Music of the Bible, Primitive music; 
Music of Ancient Greece and Rome; 
Early Christian Music; 
Beginning of Polyphony; 
Popular Secular music; 
Music of Netherlands; 
Music of Venetians and Romans ; 
The beginning of Opera and Dramatic music; 
Progress of Church music ; 
Bach, Culmination of the Early Italian Opera ; 
Handel, Scarlatti, Haydn, Sonata forms; 
Gluck and the Dramatic Reformation ; 
Mozart, The Rise of Pianism ; 
Beethoven, Romantic Opera; 
Weber, Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn; 
Chopin, Liszt, Verdi, Wagner; 
Nineteenth Century and its Musical Events; 
Later Events. 



86 Atlantic Christian College 

V — Appreciation of Music. 

Is designed to give a general idea of music, to promote 
both musical and liberal culture, and to cultivate a taste for 
the best in all forms of musical literature. In so doing, the 
student becomes familiar with the masterpieces as well as 
the smaller works of the great composers. The styles of the 
masters are compared, and as nearly as possible the essential 
elements in music are touched upon. This course furnishes 
a basis for an intelligent appreciation of all musical composi- 
tions. 

VI — Counterpoint. 

Is an important branch of musical science. 

VII — Philosophy of Music. 

Treats of the knowledge of phenomena as explained by 
practical laws, and furnishes the motives both for its produc- 
tion and nature. 

VIII — Orchestration and Ensemble. 
COURSES FOR GRADUATION 

Freshman Year. 

Piano, Voice, Violin; 

Elementary History of Music; 

General Theory; 

Sight-singing ; 

English ; 

Physics or Physiology ; 

Practice. 

Sophomore Year. 

Piano, Voice, Violin; 

Harmony ; 

Musical Appreciation; 

English ; 

Latin, French, German — elective; 

Practice. 



School of Music 87 

Junior Yeae. 

Piano, Voice, Violin; 

Harmony ; 

Musical form and analysis; 

English ; 

Latin, French, German — elective; 

Practice ; 

Pedagogy — elective. 

Senior Yeae. 

Piano, Voice, Violin; 

Counterpoint ; 

Advanced History of Music; 

Practice ; 

English, Psychology — elective. 

Bacheloe's Degeee. 

Piano, Voice, Violin ; 
Composition ; 
Instrumentation ; 
Chorus Conducting; 
Ensemble ; 

Philosophy of Music; 
Practice. 

RECITALS 

Students sufficiently advanced are required to play at the 
Student Recitals. All students of the School of Music are 
required to attend. This is one of the most important factors 
in the development of the pupil's talent, self-confidence and 
executive ability. The recitals are regularly attended by the 
faculty and students of the college and their friends. 

The School of Music and School of Expression co-operate 
and once a month give a program, followed by a social hour. 
In this manner the pupils of the special schools are brought 
in closer contact, which is most helpful. 



88 Atlantic Christian College 

THE CHOIR 

The entire student body attend chapel, but only the best 
voices are chosen for the choir, which leads the singing for 
all chapel services. Special choir practice is held weekly, 
when all members are expected to be present. 

SIGHT-SINGING 

Sight-singing is required of students in the regular Fresh- 
man year, and of all students of voice. Other students will 
be received upon application to the director. 

ORCHESTRA 

The college maintains its own orchestra. Students of 
string and wind instruments have the advantage of ensemble 
playing, with piano, beginning with simple composition, ad- 
vancing to the mastery of the classical and modern schools. 

FREE ADVANTAGES 

Collegiate pupils and Senior Academic pupils in piano 
will receive practice in ensemble playing one hour a week, 
free of charge. 

Students in voice will receive practice in sight-singing one 
hour a week free of charge. 

Orchestra practice to students of violin one hour a week 
free of charge. 

Courses in Elementary Musical History, Appreciation of 
Music, and Philosophy of Music, are free of charge. 

All students of music have free access to the college library. 

Clavier practice free to pupils of the school. 



Tuitions, Diplomas, etc. 89 

Tuitions Per Quarter 

PIANO UNDER THE DIRECTOR 

Two lessons per week $16.00 

One lesson per week 9.00 

PIANO UNDER ASSISTANT 

Two lessons per week 11.00 

One lesson per week 6.00 

VOICE 

Two lessons per week 16.00 

One lesson per week 9.00 

VIOLIN 

Two lessons per week 16.00 

One lesson per week 9.00 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

To students of the School of Education and High School, 
see Director of the School of Music. 

CREDITS 

Credit will be given for six hours in the Theoretical Course 
toward the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, or for graduation 
from the High School. 



Diplomas, Degrees and Certificates 

Teachers' diplomas will be conferred upon regular stu- 
dents of the school, who have satisfactorily completed a pre- 
scribed course, and successfully given a public recital of the 
required standing, or written a thesis. 

The Artist's diploma will be conferred upon any regular 
student of the school who has satisfactorily completed a pre- 



90 Atlantic Christian College 

scribed course, accumulated a sufficient repertoire of merit, 
and has successfully given a public recital. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Music will be conferred upon 
students who have met the requirements for either of the 
diplomas granted, have studied an additional year in the 
department, augmenting their repertoire to 'the required 
standing, and completed additional subjects along lines of 
composition. 

Certificate in public school will be granted upon the com- 
pletion of the course. 

FEES FOR PIANO PRACTICE AND OTHER EXPENSES 

Per Quarter. 

Two hours a day $3.00 

Each additional hour a day 1.50 

Clavier practice Free 

Composition, Instrumentation 5.00 

Counterpoint 5.00 

Harmony 5.00 

General Theory 1.25 

Musical History (Senior Year) 2.50 

Sight-singing Free 

Musical Form and Analysis 1.25 

Musical Appreciation Free 

Philosophy of Music Free 

Elementary History of Music (Freshman Year) Free 

Graduation Fees. 

Artists' Diploma 5.00 

Teachers' Diploma 5.00 

Bachelors' Degree 10.00 

Certificate in Public School Music 5.00 

REGULATIONS 

Pupils may enter any time, but in no case for a shorter 
period than the unexpired portion of the quarter, current to 
date of matriculation. 



Regulations 91 

No allowance will be made for lessons missed, except in 
case of protracted illness. Lessons missed through a briefer 
illness will be made up at the convenience of the teacher in 
charge. All lost lessons must be made up by the close of the 
semester. 

The school invites the patronage of students wishing pri- 
vate lessons, also beginners and children. 



92 Atlantic Christian College 

School of Expression 



Miss Anna Florence Moore, Director. 

"All time and money spent in training the voice and the 
body is an investment that pays larger interest than any 
other. ' ' — Gladstone. 

The School of Expression aims to develop greater free- 
dom and power in daily self-expression in the home, social, 
church and club life. The students who show ability for ad- 
vanced work are instructed in public speaking and dramatic 
art. The many phases of the work meet the needs and re- 
quirements of almost every individual who wishes to "sail on 
the top of his sea of troubles" — no stooping, no sagging, no 
dragging — but a body expressive of such victorious voyaging. 
Buoyancy and lightness of movement, choice English, excel- 
lent literary taste, a keen valuation and appreciation of every 
form of expression, and, above all, the very highest of ideals, 
are some of the excellent results obtained from earnest study 
in this department. 

Pupils will be granted diplomas in expression if they have 
completed, in addition to the following prescribed course of 
study, a high school course and four years of college English, 
or equivalent attainments. 

First Year. 

Relaxation exercises ; 

Exercises for poise; 

Breathing ; 

Tone production ; 

Tone projection; 

General voice culture; 

Standard of pronunciation; 

Analysis and correction of common errors; 

Accuracy of utterance; 



School of Expression 93 

Diction ; 

Classification of literature from interpreters' stand- 
point. 
Artistic exercises in physical culture. 

Second Yeae. 

Studies in tone, pitch, touch, quality, force, central 
idea, subordination, values, emotion, atmosphere, 
contrast, climaxes, and all that pertains to voice 
modulation. 

General voice culture continued; 

Gesture and fundamental bodily criteria ; 

Exercises for cultivation of animation in speaking 
and reading; 

Characterization ; 

Artistic exercises in physical culture. 

Third Yeak. 

Platform work; 

Lectures upon fundamental principles of expression; 

Conversation ; 

Story-telling ; 

Artistic rendering of dramatic selections; 

Classical drama; 

Practice teaching; 

Artistic exercises in physical culture. 

Fourth Year. 

Practice teaching; 

Interpretation of dramatic narrative, drama, and other 
forms of literature for platform work ; 

Artistic physical exercises ; 

Original work in adaptation and abridgment of selec- 
tions ; 

Presentation of good plays; 

One public recital. 



94 Atlantic Christian College 

Frequent opportunities occur for appearance in public 
recitals and literary society programs. Such public work, 
together with the presentation of good plays, will develop 
ease, grace, poise, naturalness, banish self-consciousness, and 
cultivate the personality of the indivdual student. 

Tuition, per quarter $12.50 

Diploma Fee 5.00 



Physical Education 

(Foe Women.) 

This department is organized to supply the opportunity 
for such physical work as experience has shown to be neces- 
sary to counteract the injurious effect of close application to 
mental work and to favor the attainment by the student 
body of a high state of physical efficiency. The director en- 
deavors to interest each student in some form of exercise in 
which she can become proficient. Special exercises are 
assigned to correct deficiencies and good carriage is insisted 
upon. A thorough physical examination prefaces the work 
of each individual. Every boarding pupil is required to take 
physical training. Tennis and basket-ball are open to stu- 
dents in this department, the latter game strictly for recrea- 
tion and not for competition. The basket-ball and tennis 
courts are kept in condition for out-door games. 

"Daily Ways to Health," by Mrs. Emily M. Bishop, is the 
text-book used in the course of study. Folk dances, games, 
playground work, lessons in first aid, special physiology for 
women, and lectures on physical culture are some of the ad- 
vantages offered in this department. 



School of Art 95 

School of Art 

Miss Cora Lynn Livingston, Director. 



The Art School includes courses in drawing, painting in 
oils, water color, pastel, china and designing. The regular 
course covers four years. 

Regular Course. 

First Year. — Freehand drawing from solids and casts; 
geometrical forms in light and shade; studies in color. 

Second Year. — Drawing from the antique in charcoal; 
painting in oil monochrome and color ; water-color and pastel. 

Third Year. — Drawing from the antique busts and full 
length figures ; painting still-life flowers ; landscape. 

Fourth Year. — Portraits in oil; drawing from costume 
model; out-door sketching; lives of noted artists; art appre- 
ciation. 



PUBLIC SCHOOL ART 

A two years' course in Normal Training for Teaching 
Drawing in the Public Schools. Credit is given for previous 
study. This course offers a thorough training in the public 
school work, from the primary through the upper grades. 
Stencilling, burnt work, repousee, tooled leather, basketry 
and jewel work are included. 

We have a large, well-lighted studio, and also every facility 
for our china painting. 

A diploma is granted to those who complete the regular 
course. A certificate is granted to those who complete the 
public school course. 

Tuition (two hours daily), per quarter $12.50 

Diploma Fee 5.00 

Certificate Fee 3.50 



96 Atlantic Christian College 

EXPENSES FOR COLLEGE YEAR 

The following is the itemized list of expenses, giving the basis 
from which all bills are figured : 

Matriculation fee $ 10.00 

Laboratory fees, per semester, including Science IV, V, A, 

B, C, D, E, and F 3.00 

Room rent, heat and light (to 10 P. M.), 

low, per quarter $ 7.50; each year 30.00 

Room rent, heat and light (to 10 P. M.), 

high, per quarter 11.50; each year 46.00 

Table board, in either dormitory, per quarter 33.75 ; each year 135.00 
Tuition— 16 semester hours, College, per 

semester 30.00; each year 60.00 

Tuition — each additional semester hour, per 

semester 2.00; each year 4.00 

Tuition — 20 semester hours, High School, 

per semester 20.00; each year 40.00 

Tuition — each additional semester hour, per 

semester 1.25 ; each year 2.50 

Graduation and diploma fee, High School 3.50 

Graduation and degree, College 5.00 

For tuition rates and fees in School of Music, see page 89. 

For tuition rates and fees in School of Art, see page 95. 

For tuition rates and fees in School of Expression, see page 94. 

A deposit of $5.00 from each student rooming in the men's dormi- 
tory, and of $2.00 from each student rooming in the women's dormi- 
tory will be required at the time of matriculation. This deposit will 
be returned to the student at the end of the year or at the time of 
withdrawal, less the pro rata amount required to cover damage done 
to room, furniture, or property, save regular wear from careful usage. 

All tuitions and fees are due and payable at time of matriculation. 
Tuition may be paid by the semester, but must be paid in advance. 
Board may be paid by the quarter, and must also be paid in advance. 
Where inconvenient for student to make payment, one week will be 
allowed to make adjustment. No allowance can be made for absences 
for week-end visits. 



Alumni 97 

Alumni 

1903. 

Prof. W. H. Mizell, Ph. B., A.M. Robersonville, N. C. 

Mrs. J. Y. Swain, nee Ada Tyson, B.S. Henderson, N. C. 

1905. 

Mrs. R. T. Pittman, nee Jimmie Davis, Expression Lucama, N. C. 

1906. 

Miss Rosa L. Moore, A.B. Farmville. N. C. 

Mrs. 6. A. Patterson, nee Mary Moye, A.B. Liberty, N. C. 

1907. 

Miss May Anderson, A.B. Murphy, N. C. 

Miss Daphne Carraway, Expression Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Hattie Daly, A.B., and Art Kinston, N. C. 

Mrs. Herbert Lupton, nee Elma Basnight, Voice and Art 

Tarboro, N. C. 

Mrs. Clay Andrews, nee Ruth Howard, A.B. Kinston, N. C. 

Mrs. Herman Laws, nee Mary Mosley, A.B. Kinston, N. C. 

Mrs. Palmer Harris, nee Clyde Farmer, A.B. Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Mrs. V. W. Dillon, nee Elizabeth Kennedy, Art La Grange, N. C. 

Miss Nell Kell, Art Farmville, N. C. 

Miss Sallie U. Brooks, Expression Baltimore, Md. 

1908. 

Mrs. Herbert Gizzard, nee Leone Edgerton, Voice Kenly, N. C. 

Miss Bessie Wilkinson, Piano Thomasville, Ga. 

1909. 

Mr. C. Manly Morton, A.B. Buenos Ayres, Argentina, S. A. 

Miss Sallie May Wilson, B.L. Wilson's Mills, N. C. 

Mrs. J. H. Chinnis, nee Mabel Jones, Piano Charleston, S. C. 

Mrs. C. S. Eagles, nee Susie Yeverton, Expression Saratoga, N. C. 

Mrs. Ivey Smith, nee Elizabeth Eagles, Expression 

Walstonsburg, N. C. 
Miss Mary Edwards, Expression Como, N. C. 



98 Atlantic Christian College 

1910. 

Mrs. Dunlap Neely, nee Ersie Walker, B.M. Selma, Ala. 

Miss Julia Farmer, B. L. Massey Business College, Richmond, Va. 

Miss Rosa Blanch Taylor, Piano Wilson, N. O. 

Mrs. Chas. H. Arrington, nee Annie Barrett, Piano, Rocky Mount, N. O. 

Miss Bertha Lena Riley, Piano Zebulon, N. C. 

Miss Kathleen Wallace, Art Jamesville, N. O. 

Mrs. J. A. Strickland, nee Lela Flowers, Art Norfolk, Va. 

Miss Verdie Noble, Art Kinston, N. O. 

1911. 

Miss Lossie Pearl Davis, A.B. Lucama, N. C. 

Mrs. Eugene Wood, nee Mattie Phillips, B.L. Kinston, N. O. 

Miss Mattie Neely, Piano Orrville, Ala. 

Mrs. B. B. Plyler, nee Harriet Settle, Piano Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Georgia Howard, Piano Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Elsie Gardner, Piano Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Carrie Lewis, Piano Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Annie Estelle Griffin, Expression Wilson, N. C. 

1912. 

Mr. Kenneth B. Bowen, A.B. Lexington, Ky. 

Mr. Horace H. Settle, A.B. Greenville, N. C. 

Mrs. Horace H. Settle, nee Agnes Spain, Piano Greenville, N. C. 

Mr. J. J. Walker, A.B. Greenville, N. C. 

Miss Carolyn Bowen, Voice Wilmington, N. C. 

1913. 

Prof. Glen H. Cole, Ph. B. Bethany, Va. 

Miss Susie Grey Woodard, Piano Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Elsie Glenn Langley, Piano Elm City, N. C. 

Mrs. Henry Scott, nee Sallie Bridges, A.B. Elm City, N. C. 

Miss Lillie Moore Hewitt, Art Katherine Lake, N. C. 

Miss Eunice Lee Andrews, Art Wilmington, N. C. 

1914. 

Mr. Hayes Farish, Ministerial A.B. Belhaven, N. C. 

Mrs. B. B. Plyler, nee Harriet Settle, Voice Wilson, N. C. 

Mr. Benjamin F. Oden, A.B. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Miss Blanche T. Wells, Voice Elm City, N. C. 

Mrs. Earl Gresham, nee Kathryn Wells, Piano Norfolk, Va. 

Miss Elsie Pough, Piano Oriental, N. C. 



Alumni 99 

Miss Alice Privett, Piano Wilson, N. C. 

Mrs. W. S. Tucker, nee Velma Harrington, Art Kinston, N. C. 

1915. 

Mrs. B. B. Plyler, nee Harriet Settle, B.M. Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Henrietta Moye, A.B. and Piano Farmville, N. C. 

Miss Fannie Moye, A.B. Farmville, N. C. 

Miss Mary Belle Smith, A.B. Rural Hall, N. C. 

Miss Elizabeth Hodges, B.L. and Art La Grange, N. C. 

Miss Jessie Hodges, Piano Washington, N. C. 

Miss Hattie Hodges, Piano and Expression La Grange, N. C. 

Miss Lill Chapman, Piano Grifton, N. C. 

1916. 

Miss Willie Euline Chestnut, A.B. La Grange, N. C. 

Miss Sallie Hadley, A.B. Hassel, N. C. 

Miss Fannie Manning, A.B. Everett, N. C. 

Miss Irma May Cannon, A.B. Ayden, N. C. 

Miss Meta Irene Barrington, A.B. Clayton, N. C. 

Miss Jessie A. D. Hodges, A.B. Everett, N. C. 

Mr. Sam M. Jones, A.B. Mesic, N. C. 

Miss Ritta Ruth Whitley, Expression Wendell, N. C. 

Miss Ruth Hardy, Voice and Expression Colquitt, Ga. 

Mr. Joel E. Vause, Expression Kinston, N. C. 

Miss Frances Elizabeth Kinsey, Piano Wendell, N. C. 

Seniors, 1917 

Mr. S. L. Sadler, A.B. Wilson, N. C. 

Mrs. S. L. Sadler, A.B. Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Hattie Clem Bridges, A.B. Elm City, N. C. 

Miss Mary Richardson, A.B. Garnett, S. C. 

Miss Maude Russell, A.B. Russellville, S. C. 

Mr. H. M. Ainsley, A.B. Creswell, N. C. 

Miss Claire Hodges, A.B. La Grange, N. C. 

Miss Ella Hackney, A.B. Wilson, N. C. 

Miss Maude Bowen, Piano Belhaven, N. C. 

Miss Juanita Crockett, Art Dunn, N. C. 

Miss Bonita Wolff, Expression Rural Hall, N. C. 



100 Atlantic Christian College 



lM tj& %&*>* 



y sj 



Roster of Students 

— Anderson, James Banks North Carolina 

/ Askew, Carrie North Carolina 

Bailey, Emma North Carolina 

■""Barnes, Earnest T. North Carolina 

Barnes, Margaret McDonald North Carolina 

—Barnes, Tony North Carolina 

— -Blount, Jack North Carolina 

Bowen, Hilary Thomas North Carolina 

Bowen, Timothy Washington North Carolina 

Bowep, Maude North Carolina 

I Bridges, Hattie Clem North Carolina 

Brinson, Lloyd Thompson North Carolina 

Brinson, Marion North Carolina 

Brown, Bland Powell North Carolina 

Brown, Lucile North Carolina 

Bullock, Bernice North Carolina 

Burden, William Clifford North Carolina 

Case, 'Catherine Mable Indiana 

Case, Perry Indiana 

Carawan, Guy North Carolina 

Carawan, Roy North Carolina 

Carter, Jennie Lee Ohio 

I Chapman, Lloyd James North Carolina 

Clark, Bessie North Carolina 

! Clay, Lida Pearl West Virginia 

Clay, Lura Neuby West Virginia 

Collins, Estelle Marie North Carolina 

' Congleton, Jennie Whitley North Carolina 

Corbett, Mattie North Carolina 

Crockett, Juanita North Carolina 

/ Dampier, Jessie Gaynelle North Carolina 

I Davis, John North Carolina 

Dawes, Madge Williams North Carolina 

Deans, Annie Lee North Carolina 

1 Dixon, Ada Grey North Carolina 

! Drake, Thomas North Carolina 

Dukes, Carl P. North Carolina 

Dupree, Wilmer S. North Carolina 

Farmer, Carrie Lane North Carolina 

Felgar, Gerald Wickham Ohio 

Gilbert, Selma North Carolina 



Roster of Students 101 

'Granger, Pauline North Carolina 

\ Grice, Luther Bernice North Carolina 

Gallop, Alice Ida North Carolina 

Gallop, Raymond Fitchuler North Carolina 

Gallop, Zebulon Vance North Carolina 

Hackney, Mary Ella North Carolina 

Hackney, Lula North Carolina 

Henderson, William Otto Alabama 

Hardison, Lillie Belle North Carolina 

Harmon, Edward Dempsey Virginia 

Hodges, Charlotte Harper North Carolina 

Hodges, Claire North Carolina 

Hopper, Gorrell Lee North Carolina 

Isbell, Woney Alabama 

Jackson, Katherine North Carolina 

Johnson, Gleamious North Carolina 

Krise, Carrie Lee Virginia 

Krise, Nellie Mae Virginia 

Lappin, Warren C. Illinois 

Lang, Evelyn Irene North Carolina 

Leary, Hunter Smith North Carolina 

Mattox, Gattie Lee North Carolina 

Mattox, George North Carolina 

Mattox, Oscar Theodore North Carolina 

Mattox, William Thomas North Carolina 

Massey, Willie Elaine North Carolina 

McCotter, Charlie Jennings North Carolina 

McCotter, Sam North Carolina 

Mcllwean, Burness North Carolina 

'* Moore, Willie Gray North Carolina 

v --v\ Moore, Mary L. North Carolina 

Moore, Ruth North Carolina 

Moore, Elva Dare North Carolina 

Moore, Annie Belle North Carolina 

Moore, Thomas P. North Carolina 

■ Morris, Rena Mercedes North Carolina 

: Moye, Lawrence North Carolina 

Page, Lillian Maude Massachusetts 

! Paschall, Joshua Earnest North Carolina 

Peele, Agnes North Carolina 

\ Perry, Weston North Carolina 

Perry, Jessie Elizabeth North Carolina 

Phillips, Rupert Andrew North Carolina 

* Pittman, Ethel Virginia North Carolina 

i Poole, Mamie Gertrude North Carolina 



102 Atlantic Christian College 

Proctor, Mary Elizabeth North Carolina 

Quinerly, Herbert Patrick North Carolina 

Raulen, Charlie Gray North Carolina 

Respess, Elsie Stewart North Carolina 

Rice, Grace Jewel North Carolina 

Richardson, Mary E. South Carolina 

Riley, Myrtle North Carolina 

Rose, John T. North Carolina 

Ross, John North Carolina 

Russell, Maude C. South Carolina 

Sadler, M. E. North Carolina 

Sadler, S. L. North Carolina 

Sadler, Mrs. S. L. North Carolina 

Smith, Frank Andrews North Carolina 

Smith, Viola Neva North Carolina 

Spiegel, Grady Alabama 

Stallings, Nora North Carolina 

Stanton, Annie Louise North Carolina 

Swain, Fannie Windley North Carolina 

t Taylor, James M. North Carolina 

Taylor, James William North Carolina 

I Taylor, Vaughn Mark North Carolina 

I Taylor, Daisy Mae North Carolina 

Tingle, Tonimie Arthur North Carolina 

Uzzell, Ethel North Carolina 

Uzzell, Helen North Carolina 

1 Vause, Joel Elmore North Carolina 

I Vendric, Hervey H. North Carolina 

Walton, Percy Shelley North Carolina 

Waite, Mrs. J. H. Pennsylvania 

Watson, Needham Herrin North Carolina 

' Whitney, Margaret Elizabeth North Carolina 

Whorton, Leamon North Carolina 

Winstead, Daisy Pearl North Carolina 

Wolff, Bonita North Carolina 

Woodard, Minnie Bell North Carolina 

Woodard, Varina Mildred North Carolina 

Worthington, Lucretia North Carolina 



Roster of Students 103 

School of Music 

I— PIANO 

Askew, Carrie North Carolina 

Bridges, Hattie Clem North Carolina 

Bowen, Maude North Carolina 

Case, Perry Indiana 

Case, Mrs. Perry Indiana 

Collins, Estelle Marie North Carolina 

Congleton, Jennie Whitley North Carolina 

Corbett, Mattie North Carolina 

Dampier, Jessie North Carolina 

Dixon, Ada Grey North Carolina 

Gallop, Alice North Carolina 

Grainger, Pauline North Carolina 

Hackney, Lula North Carolina 

Hardison, Lillie Belle North Carolina 

Jackson, Katherine North Carolina 

Lang, Evelyn North Carolina 

Mattox, Gattie Lee North Carolina 

Mcllwean, Burness North Carolina 

Moore, Mary L. North Carolina 

Moore, Elva D. North Carolina 

Moore, Annie Belle North Carolina 

Page, Lillian Massachusetts 

Perry, Jessie North Carolina 

Raulen, Charlie Gray North Carolina 

Richardson, Mary South Carolina 

Riley, Myrtle North Carolina 

Ross, John North Carolina 

Smith, Viola North Carolina 

Stallings, Nora North Carolina 

Uzzell, Ethel North Carolina 

Uzzell, Helen North Carolina 

Woodard, Minnie Belle North Carolina 

Woodard, Varina North Carolina 

H_VOICE 

Bailey, Emma Braswell North Carolina 

Carawan, Guy North Carolina 

Carter, Jennie Lee Ohio 

Case, Mrs. Perry Indiana 

Deans, Annie Lee North Carolina 

Dixon, Ada Grey North Carolina 



104 Atlantic Christian College 

Duke, Carl P. North Carolina 

Felgar, Gerald W. Ohio 

Gallop, Alice North Carolina 

Massey, Willie Elaine North Carolina 

Mattox, Gattie Lee North Carolina 

Moore, Mary L. North Carolina 

Respess, Elsie S. North Carolina 

Riley, Myrtle . North Carolina 

Taylor, Daisy Mae North Carolina 

Taylor, James W. North Carolina 

Vause, Joel E. North Carolina 

Whorton, Leamon North Carolina 

Winstead, Daisy Pearl North Carolina 

School of Art 

Bailey, Emma North Carolina 

Bowen, Maude North Carolina 

Case, Mrs. Perry Indiana 

Congleton, Jennie Whitley North Carolina 

Crockett, Juanita North Carolina 

Hodges, Claire North Carolina 

Krise, Carrie Virginia 

Moore, Ruth North Carolina 

Morris, Rena North Carolina 

Proctor, Mary North Carolina 

Swain, Fannie W. North Carolina 



School of Expression 



Barnes, Margaret North Carolina 

Bridges, Hattie Clem North Carolina 

Bowen, Maude North Carolina 

Clay, Lura Neuby Virginia 

Crockett, Juanita North Carolina 

Farmer, Carrie Lane North Carolina 

Grainger, Pauline North Carolina 

Henderson, Otto Alabama 

Hodges, Charlotte North Carolina 

Hodges, Claire North Carolina 

Paschal, J. Earnest North Carolina 

Proctor, Mary North Carolina 

Respess, Elsie S. North Carolina 

Sadler, Magruder E. North Carolina 



Roster of Students 105 

Swain, Fannie W. North Carolina 

Vendric, Hervey North Carolina 

Wolff, Bonita North Carolina 

Ministerial and Missionary Students 

Bowen, Hilary Thomas North Carolina 

Bowen, Timothy Washington North Carolina 

'Brinson, Lloyd Thompson North Carolina 

Brinson, Marion North Carolina 

Grice, Luther Bernice North Carolina 

Henderson, William Otto Alabama 

Harmon, Dempsey Edward Virginia 

Mattox, Oscar Theodore North Carolina 

Mattox, William Thomas North Carolina 

Phillips, Rupert Andrew North Carolina 

Rose, John T. North Carolina 

Sadler, Magruder E. North Carolina 

Sadler, S. Lee North Carolina 

Spiegel, Grady Alabama 

Taylor, James M. North Carolina 

Vause, Joel E. North Carolina 

Walton, Percy Shelley North Carolina 

Worthington, Lucretia North Carolina 



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Raleigh, North Carolina 



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